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Mathieu Denoël

Restricted Access

Mathieu Denoël

Restricted Access

Mathieu Denoël

Restricted Access

Mathieu Denoël and D. James Harris

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Oldřich Kopecký, Mathieu Denoël and Jiří Vojar

Abstract

Many species with complex life cycles, such as caudate amphibians, migrate from terrestrial to aquatic habitats for reproduction. However, movements between reproductive ponds within a breeding season have rarely been studied and are usually considered to be limited. Our aim was to determine whether this pattern occurs frequently in Alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris) inhabiting complexes of small ruts on muddy forest tracks. We analysed capture-recapture data for individually marked newts as a function of locality, sex, body condition and hydroperiod throughout the breeding season. More than one third of the newts changed their ruts. Movements occurred more often towards ruts that did not dry during the breeding season. The body condition of males that changed ponds (but not that of females) was higher compared to that of resident newts in one of the studied populations. The relatively high frequency of movements between ruts can be seen as an adaptive strategy in unpredictable habitats which have a high probability of drying. The promiscuous pattern of newts also favours low site tenacity, because few sexual partners are available in each rut. Because of the broad occurrence of this kind of habitat, future studies should take into account these movements to better understand newt population dynamics and how to apply adequate conservation measures.

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Ben Wielstra, Daniele Canestrelli, Milena Cvijanović, Mathieu Denoël, Anna Fijarczyk, Daniel Jablonski, Marcin Liana, Borislav Naumov, Kurtuluş Olgun, Maciej Pabijan, Alice Pezzarossa, Georgi Popgeorgiev, Daniele Salvi, Yali Si, Neftalí Sillero, Konstantinos Sotiropoulos, Piotr Zieliński and Wiesław Babik

Abstract

The ‘smooth newt’, the taxon traditionally referred to as Lissotriton vulgaris, consists of multiple morphologically distinct taxa. Given the uncertainty concerning the validity and rank of these taxa, L. vulgaris sensu lato has often been treated as a single, polytypic species. A recent study, driven by genetic data, proposed to recognize five species, L. graecus, L. kosswigi, L. lantzi, L. schmidtleri and a more restricted L. vulgaris. The Carpathian newt L. montandoni was confirmed to be a closely related sister species. We propose to refer to this collective of six Lissotriton species as the smooth newt or Lissotriton vulgaris species complex. Guided by comprehensive genomic data from throughout the range of the smooth newt species complex we 1) delineate the distribution ranges, 2) provide a distribution database, and 3) produce distribution maps according to the format of the New Atlas of Amphibians and Reptiles of Europe, for the six constituent species. This allows us to 4) highlight regions where more research is needed to determine the position of contact zones.

Open Access

Neftali Sillero, João Campos, Anna Bonardi, Claudia Corti, Raymond Creemers, Pierre-Andre Crochet, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailović, Mathieu Denoël, Gentile Francesco Ficetola, João Gonçalves, Sergei Kuzmin, Petros Lymberakis, Philip de Pous, Ariel Rodríguez, Roberto Sindaco, Jeroen Speybroeck, Bert Toxopeus, David R. Vieites and Miguel Vences

A precise knowledge of the spatial distribution of taxa is essential for decision-making processes in land management and biodiversity conservation, both for present and under future global change scenarios. This is a key base for several scientific disciplines (e.g. macro-ecology, biogeography, evolutionary biology, spatial planning, or environmental impact assessment) that rely on species distribution maps. An atlas summarizing the distribution of European amphibians and reptiles with 50 × 50 km resolution maps based on ca. 85 000 grid records was published by the Societas Europaea Herpetologica (SEH) in 1997. Since then, more detailed species distribution maps covering large parts of Europe became available, while taxonomic progress has led to a plethora of taxonomic changes including new species descriptions. To account for these progresses, we compiled information from different data sources: published in books and websites, ongoing national atlases, personal data kindly provided to the SEH, the 1997 European Atlas, and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF). Databases were homogenised, deleting all information except species names and coordinates, projected to the same coordinate system (WGS84) and transformed into a 50 × 50 km grid. The newly compiled database comprises more than 384 000 grid and locality records distributed across 40 countries. We calculated species richness maps as well as maps of Corrected Weighted Endemism and defined species distribution types (i.e. groups of species with similar distribution patterns) by hierarchical cluster analysis using Jaccard’s index as association measure. Our analysis serves as a preliminary step towards an interactive, dynamic and online distributed database system (NA2RE system) of the current spatial distribution of European amphibians and reptiles. The NA2RE system will serve as well to monitor potential temporal changes in their distributions. Grid maps of all species are made available along with this paper as a tool for decision-making and conservation-related studies and actions. We also identify taxonomic and geographic gaps of knowledge that need to be filled, and we highlight the need to add temporal and altitudinal data for all records, to allow tracking potential species distribution changes as well as detailed modelling of the impacts of land use and climate change on European amphibians and reptiles.