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Although Johann Wenck and some nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars associated Nicholas of Cusa with pantheism, major Roman Catholic theologians in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries embraced Cusanus’ view of the relation of the world to God. Indeed, Théophile Raynaud, a learned Jesuit theologian, saw his doctrine of God as the complicatio or enfolding of all things as useful for opposing medieval pantheists like David of Dinant and Amalric of Bena. Johann Eck, Théophile Raynaud, and Louis Thomassin drew upon this teaching on God as enfolding all things and other elements of Cusanus’ corpus not to reject but to renew early modern Catholic scholastic theology.

In: Nicholas of Cusa and the Making of the Early Modern World

Although Johann Wenck and some nineteenth- and twentieth-century scholars associated Nicholas of Cusa with pantheism, major Roman Catholic theologians in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries embraced Cusanus’ view of the relation of the world to God. Indeed, Théophile Raynaud, a learned Jesuit theologian, saw his doctrine of God as the complicatio or enfolding of all things as useful for opposing medieval pantheists like David of Dinant and Amalric of Bena. Johann Eck, Théophile Raynaud, and Louis Thomassin drew upon this teaching on God as enfolding all things and other elements of Cusanus’ corpus not to reject but to renew early modern Catholic scholastic theology.

In: Nicholas of Cusa and the Making of the Early Modern World
In: Beyond Dordt and De Auxiliis
The Dynamics of Protestant and Catholic Soteriology in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
Beyond Dordt and ‘De Auxiliis’ explores post-Reformation inter-confessional theological exchange on soteriological topics including predestination, grace, and free choice. These doctrines remained controversial within confessional traditions after the Reformation, as Dominicans and Jesuits and later Calvinists and Arminians argued about these critical issues in the Augustinian theological heritage. Some of those involved in condemning Arminianism at the Synod of Dordt (1618-1619) were inspired by Dominican followers of Thomas Aquinas in Spain who had recently opposed the vigorous defense of free choice by Jesuit Molinists in the Congregatio de auxiliis (1598-1607). This volume, appearing on the 400th anniversary of the closing of the Synod of Dordt, brings together a group of scholars working in fields that only rarely speak to one another to address these theological debates that cross geographical and confessional boundaries.
In: Beyond Dordt and De Auxiliis