Search Results

Abstract

Two distinguishing marks of voluntaristic conceptions of human action can be found already in the 12th century, not only in the work of Bonaventura’s successors: 1. the will is free to act against reasons’s dictates; 2. moral responsibility depends on this conception of the will’s freedom. A number of theologians from the 1130s to the 1170s accepted those claims, which have been originally formulated by Bernard of Clairvaux. Robert of Melun elaborated them in a systematical way and coined the terminological distinctions which were controversely discussed in the following centuries. The paper edits and interprets some of his texts about voluntary action. Furthermore, it shows that Bernard’s and Robert’s ideas have been transported by their intellectualist critics in the 13th century.

In: Vivarium
In: Mnemosyne
In: Proklos. Methode, Seelenlehre, Metaphysik
In: Proklos. Methode, Seelenlehre, Metaphysik
In: Virtue Ethics in the Middle Ages
Akten der Konferenz in Jena am 18.-20. September 2003
This volume deals with the philosophy of Proclus, the most influential philosopher of the Neoplatonic school of Athens. Its 17 essays present the major themes of Proclus’ work.
The first part discusses the method of Proclus’ philosophy, concentrating on his theory of language and his interpretation of Plato. The second part focusses on his theory of the soul, especially of the human soul and its various functions. The third part covers Proclus’ metaphysics, his theory of ideas and his famous scheme of duration, procession and reversion.
Thus, the volume contributes to the renewed interest in Neoplatonism. For the specialists, it contains some new insights into Proclus’ thought. For the non-specialist, the volume can be used as introductory text to the main themes of Proclean philosophy.
In: Proklos. Methode, Seelenlehre, Metaphysik
In: Proklos. Methode, Seelenlehre, Metaphysik
In: Proklos. Methode, Seelenlehre, Metaphysik