Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author or Editor: Matthias Schwartz x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Kulturtransfer und Verlagsarbeit
In: Abenteuer in der Moderne
In: Abenteuer in der Moderne
In: Kulturtransfer und Verlagsarbeit
In: Interventionen in die Zeit
In: Science oder Fiction?

Abstract

The essay focuses on two early reportages by Hanna Krall and Ryszard Kapuściński, written in the late 1960s, at a time when they both worked as journalists in the Soviet Union and independently visited Central Asian Uzbekistan and its capital Tashkent. It contextualises their writing within the literary-theoretical and journalistic debates taking place in the People’s Republic of Poland at the time, debates on documentary writing and the genre of reportage. Against this background, the essay demonstrates how both authors already began to develop their personal ’techniques of documenting’ in those years. Whereas Kapuściński creates allegorical images of tyranny and post-Stalinist society with an eye for the exotic ‘other,’ Krall searches for modes of expressing individual life trajectories of self-confident women between tradition and modernity.

In: Documentary Aesthetics in the Long 1960s in Eastern Europe and Beyond
Volume Editors: and
This book is the first to deal with documentary aesthetic practices of the post-war period in Eastern Europe in a comparative perspective. The contributions examine the specific forms and modes of documentary representations and the role they played in the formation of new aesthetic trends during the cultural-political transition of the long 1960s. This documentary first-hand approach to the world aimed to break up unquestioned ideological structures and expose tabooed truths in order to engender much-needed social changes. New ways of depicting daily life, writing testimony or subjective reportage emerged that still shape cultural debates today.

Abstract

This introductory essay defines documentary aesthetics as a guiding mode of various artistic concepts and practices during the long 1960s. By reconstructing contemporary debates in Eastern Europe and particularly within the Soviet Union, it outlines how documentary art forms became an essential means of approaching a painful and often tabooed past, experimenting with new modes and ethics of subjectivity and coming to terms with a rapidly changing media environment. The essay provides a broad historical and comparative overview on the development of this phenomenon in Europe and beyond. In doing so, it distinguishes the documentary modes of representation of the 1960s from those of the interwar period. Unlike the 1920s, which aimed at an avant-garde renewal and modernisation of perception, the post-war era emphasised an immediate, sensitive, nuanced, testimonial ‘first-hand’ access to ostracised and oblivious facets of reality. Not only does this complexity and ambiguity of this long-neglected ‘documentary fashion’ provide a historical orientation for today’s vibrant documentary art practices, but it also invites us to review our presuppositions concerning the post-war situation in Eastern European arts.

In: Documentary Aesthetics in the Long 1960s in Eastern Europe and Beyond