Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: Matyáš Havrda x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: The Seventh Book of the Stromateis
Author: Matyáš Havrda

Abstract

In the first two pages of the so-called eighth book of the Stromateis, Clement outlines a method of inquiry suitable to the followers of the “really true philosophy,” i.e. the Christians. He does so in response to the biblical command Seek and you will find, knock and it will open, ask and it will be given to you (Matt 7:7). A close reading of these pages shows that Clement thinks of Christian inquiry as a process in the course of which the meaning of difficult scriptural passages is revealed on the basis of Scripture itself. He also thinks of it as a process of teaching, accompanied by the examination of various (other than biblical) views in light of the “common notions”. How does this outline fit in with the remaining sections of the “eighth book,” consisting, for the most part, of purely philosophical material whose relevance to anything Christian is far from plain? Analysing the contents of the first “chapter” and other (rare) occasions in the remaining sections where traces of Clement’s Christian interests are discernible, this paper argues that, when composing the text known as Stromateis viii, Clement approached his source-material from the perspective of a biblical exegete and a Christian teacher. Nevertheless, he did not subordinate the material to this perspective, leaving it open to further exploitation and limiting himself to occasional comments and glosses.

In: Clement’s Biblical Exegesis
Early Christian reception of Greek scientific methodology
Author: Matyáš Havrda
The so-called eighth Stromateus (‘liber logicus’) by Clement of Alexandria (d. before 221 C.E.) is an understudied source for ancient philosophy, particularly the tradition of the Aristotelian methodology of science, scepticism, and the theories of causation. A series of capitula dealing with inquiry and demonstration, it bears but few traces of Christian interests.

In this volume, Matyáš Havrda provides a new edition, translation, and lemmatic commentary of the text. The vexing question of the origin of this material and its place within Clement’s oeuvre is also addressed. Defending the view of ‘liber logicus’ as a collection of excerpts made or adopted by Clement for his own (apologetic and exegetical) use, Havrda argues that its source could be Galen’s lost treatise On Demonstration.
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria
In: The So-Called Eighth Stromateus by Clement of Alexandria