Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for

  • Author or Editor: Maya Balakirsky Katz x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: IMAGES

The Jewish Brumberg sisters, known as the “grandmothers of Soviet animation,” established their own directors’ group at the newly-formed Soyuzmultfilm through which they sheltered and nurtured an underemployed artistic milieu. A case study of the personal, professional, and creative biographies of Valentina and Zinaida Brumberg reveals how they used their directors’ group as a safe haven for Moscow’s disenfranchised intellectual community after the closing of avant-garde theaters in the 1930s and 1940s.

In: IMAGES

After Stalin consolidated the major animation studios and closed down smaller regional studios to create a single Moscow-based drawn and puppet animation studio in 1934–36, the animation studio Soyuzmultfilm became the largest animation studio in Eastern Europe. In the 1960s, Soviet Jewish animators focused on the theme of social geography and developed individual characters in relationship to social mapping. This essay analyses the enigmatic Cheburashka, the Soviet Mickey Mouse, whose popularity as a Communist ideal led to his starring role as Soyuzmultfilm’s most enduring logo. It is particularly concerned with the development of the ethnically-unidentifiable Cheburashka against the history of the Moscow Zoo and its inter-species exhibitions.

In: IMAGES
In: IMAGES
In: IMAGES
In: IMAGES