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Abstract

During the first years of the seventeenth century and mainly during the years previous to the Expulsion of the Moriscos it was discussed, on the one hand, if Moriscos children should or should not be baptized since they were surely going to apostatize. And it was also discussed if children under age could be expelled or not, if they were innocent. It was a debate on linage and blood in the one hand, versus education (crianza) and social context on the other. The case of Jewish children in Visighotic Spain was alluded in favour of not baptizing children and of expelling them with their parents. Contrary to what we might expect, it was not the hardliners who wanted to separate the children from their parents, but rather those who did not believe in the physiological transmission of religion. It was precisely those who believed in assimilation and had been against the Expulsion who thought that by separating the children from their parents they could be fully integrated into Christian society, as they believed that not all Moriscos were heretics, and that, in any case, their children were innocent. In the end, after a great deal of debate and vacillation, and very much against the opinion of the Pope, it was decided that the children, too, would be expelled.

In: Forced Conversion in Christianity, Judaism and Islam
In: Space and Conversion in Global Perspective
In: Space and Conversion in Global Perspective
This is a book about revolutionary movements of a messianic and millenarian character, led by a "mahdi", in Islamic terms, a charismatic messianic leader. It also addresses the question of mediation between God and men and the political repercussions of this question in the history of the pre-Modern Muslim West. Mahdism is considered in relation to sufi ideas, terminology and symbols which shape notions of authority and of legitimate power when claiming direct, intimate contact between the holy and the divine. The relationship between mahdism and the legitimacy of power, the process by which the messianic paradigm becomes inseparable from the claim to the caliphate are amply discussed. The contents of the book range from the times of the Muslim conquest of North Africa and Iberia, to the first part of the XVIIth century with the end of Muslim Iberia and the beginnings of European intervention in Morocco.
In: After Conversion
In: After Conversion
In: After Conversion
In: After Conversion