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Editor-in-Chief: Michael A. Peters
This is a fully Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content, in exchange for an Article Publication Charge. For more information visit the Brill Open dedicated webpage.

As the first-ever video journal of education and pedagogy, owned by the Association for Visual Pedagogies Inc (AVP), our aim is to initiate a new movement in education publishing. VJEP integrates visual approaches to educational research and practitioner knowledge concerning learning and teaching in its broadest sense. It facilitates the rapid spread of ideas and open access to video pedagogy demonstrations in an international and comparative context in an ‘author pays’ model that is based on institutional subscriptions. The VJEP provides a platform for cross-disciplinary research and demonstrated pedagogy while providing a ready means to capture and globally share practitioner knowledge. VJEP wants to establish a new frontier in education publishing and scientific communication and to promote the aims of the Association for Visual Pedagogies (AVP) which seeks to privilege all things visual in thought and practice.

In particular, the journal focuses on 3 main areas:

- Educational research at large, in all forms of education and pedagogy, containing a strong video/visual component. The video component must be outstanding either in the methodology, in the way data were collected, or results that are shown. This includes in particular:
o Teacher education
o Classroom teacher and child observation
o Workplace learning
oTechnology and social learning across multi-disciplinary domains of practice
- Visual approaches to educational research
o Research on new visualization methodologies
o Research and case-based studies to facilitate video data collection, dissemination, critical engagement and analysis
o Integrated approaches

- Research in visual and digital humanities, including philosophical reflection on the use of digital and visual resources in the humanities, particularly:
o Philosophical approaches in the study of visuality in education and society
o Other forms of visual pedagogy such as documentary, film and social media
o Cultural analytics, cultural studies and ethnography

VJEP will publish 10 articles per volume per year, including interviews and videos on teaching practice. The papers will be published online only at regular intervals to maintain the journal’s impact and each will have a video component. Manuscripts will be subject to a rigorous anonymous peer review process.

To submit your paper and proposals please contact Michael A. Peters (mpeters@bnu.edu.cn) and Jayne E. White (jayne.white@rmt.edu.au)

Association for Visual Pedagogies (AVP), in collaboration with RMIT presents the 4th international AVP conference: Ocular becoming in dangerous times: The politics of 'seeing'. Please find more information on the conference and submissions here.

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Rethinking Theory and Practice
This series maps the emergent field of educational futures. It will commission books on the futures of education in relation to the question of globalisation and knowledge economy. It seeks authors who can demonstrate their understanding of discourses of the knowledge and learning economies. It aspires to build a consistent approach to educational futures in terms of traditional methods, including scenario planning and foresight, as well as imaginative narratives, and it will examine examples of futures research in education, pedagogical experiments, new utopian thinking, and educational policy futures with a strong accent on actual policies and examples.
Contexts of Education is a new series of handbooks that embraces both a creative approach to educational issues focused on context and a new publishing credo.
All educational concepts and issues have a home and belong to a context. This is the starting premise for this new series. One of the big intellectual breakthroughs of post-war science and philosophy was to emphasise the theory-ladenness of observations and facts—facts and observations cannot be established independent of a theoretical context. In other words, facts and observations are radically context-dependent. We cannot just see what we like or choose to see. In the same way, scholars are argue that concepts and constructs also are relative to a context, whether this be a theory, schema, framework, perspective or network of beliefs. Background knowledge always intrudes; it is there, difficult to articulate, tacit and operates to shape and help form our perceptions. This is the central driving insight of a generation of thinkers from Ludwig Wittgenstein and Karl Popper to Thomas Kuhn and Jürgen Habermas. Increasingly, in social philosophy, hermeneutics, and literary criticism textualism has given way to contextualism, paving the way for the introduction of the notions of ‘frameworks’, ‘paradigms’ and ‘networks’—concepts that emphasize a new ecology of thought.
This new series is predicated upon this insight and movement. It emphasises the importance of context in the establishment of educational facts and observations and the framing of educational hypotheses and theories. It also emphasises the relation between text and context, the discursive and the institution, the local and the global. Accordingly, it emphasizes the significance of contexts at all levels of inquiry: scientific contexts; theoretical contexts; political, social and economic contexts; local and global contexts; contexts for learning and teaching; and, cultural and interdisciplinary contexts.
Contexts of Education, as handbooks, are conceived as reference texts that also can serve as texts.
“Open education involves a commitment to openness and is therefore inevitably a political and social project. The concept of openness in regard to education pre-dates the openness movement that begins with free software and open source in the mid-1980s with roots going back to the Enlightenment that are bound up with the philosophical foundations of modern education with its commitments to freedom, citizenship, knowledge for all, social progress and individual transformation. Yet in another way political, social and technological developments have taken place in parallel alongside the history of the movement of open education that have heightened certain political and epistemological features and technological enabled others that emphasize questions of access to knowledge, the co-production and co-design of educational programs and of knowledge, the sharing, use, reuse and modification of resources while enhancing the ethics of participation and collaboration. Open education as a movement sits within the broader framework of the history of openness that brings together a number of disciplines and fields to impact directly upon the value of knowledge and learning, their geographic distribution and ownership, and their organization.”
[ http://www.ffst.hr/ENCYCLOPAEDIA/]
This new series is devoted to the general theory and practice of open education in all its forms.
The knowledge, learning and creative economies manifest the changing significance of intellectual capital and the thickening connections between economic growth, knowledge and creativity. Increasingly economic and social activity is comprised by the ‘symbolic’ or ‘weightless’ economy with its iconic, immaterial and digital goods. This new digital knowledge economy includes new international labor that rely on developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) that are changing the format, density and nature of the exchange and flows of knowledge, research and scholarship. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. New global cultures of knowledge and research networks are spreading rapidly. New forms of openness and networking, cross-border people movement, flows of capital, portal cities and intensive development zones all are changing the conditions of imagining and producing and the sharing of creative work in different spheres. At the centre of is the economy/creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? This new series investigates all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy in order to extend the dialogue about the relationship between contemporary higher education and the changing face of contemporary economies.
Partnerships and collaboration are two ideas that have transformed teacher education and enhanced teacher professional learning, enquiry and research. Increasingly, the changing context in which teachers work requires them to continually update and enhance their knowledge and skills, and to engage in different forms of professional development in order to understand the needs of their pupils and the communities they come from. This underlines the need for stronger partnerships to connect teachers with each other, with teacher education providers, with local communities, with local government, and with business and National Government Organizations (NGOs). Educational partnerships as a concept recognises the new ecology of digital interconnectivity, the need for stronger collaboration at all levels, and a new collective responsibility for education. Partnerships in the form of transnational education, public-private collaborations, interactions between formal and informal educational organisations, collaborations between tertiary organisations and industry/the service sector and amongst schools and between schools and their communities have emerged as strong policy and practice drivers. This series aims to span this broad understanding of partnership and make a contribution to both theory and practice.
This series is an edition dedicated to the revival of the critical approaches of key thinkers whose thought has strongly influenced and shaped educational theory: Rousseau, Marx, Gramsci, Dewey, Marcuse, Rogers, Freire, Derrida, Foucault, Said and Butler. In this first edition the series includes eleven monographs in total, each approximately sixty pages long with three chapters, a brief introduction, a bibliographical essay, a glossary and series of study questions. The aim is designed to provide cheap and accessible texts for students that give clear accounts of these thinkers and their significance for educational theory. The monographs are written by a group of internationally renown scholars whose own work embodies the critical ethos.
Prophetically, almost thirty years ago Jean-François Lyotard forecast the end of the modern research university based on Enlightenment principles. He envisaged the emergence of technical institutes in the service of the information-rich global multinationals. This book reflects on the post-war Western university and its discourses charting the crisis of the concept of the modern university. First, it examines the university within a global networked economy; second, it adopts poststructuralist perspectives in epistemology, politics and ethics to appraise the role of the contemporary university; third, it introduces the notion of 'development' in a critical fashion as a way of explaining its potentially new regional and international learning roles; fourth, it analyzes the rise of global science and the disciplines in the context of the global economy; and, finally, it raises Lyotard’s 'logic of performativity' and the assessment of research quality within a neoliberal economy, linking it firmly to the question of freedom and the republic of science.
Essays in Political and Economic Philosophy
The American Dream that crystallized around James Truslow Adams’ The Epic of America originally formulated in the early 1930s and was conditioned by a decade of complexity and contradiction, of big government projects, intensely fierce nationalism, the definition of the American way, and a distinctive collection of American iconic narratives has had the power and force to successively reshape America for every new generation. Indeed, Adam’s dream of opportunity for each according to ability or achievement shaped against the old class culture of Europe emphasizes a vision of social order in which each person can succeed despite their social origins. Barack Obama, a skillful rhetorician and intelligent politician, talks of restoring the American and has used its narrative resources to define his campaign and his policies. In a time of international and domestic crisis, of massive sovereign debt, of the failure of neoliberalism, of growing inequalities, the question is whether the American Dream and the vision of an equal education on which it rests can be revitalized
In: Beijing International Review of Education