Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael Avioz x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

Abstract

This article deals with the troublesome issue of Jeremiah's calls for revenge in the so-called 'Jeremiah's laments' (Jer xi-xx). Such calls are strange due to the fact Israelite prophets are usually conceived as intercessors. After surveying the different views and criticizing them, the author offers three solutions to the problem. Instead of focusing on our moral judgment of Jeremiah's calls for revenge, the author tries to show how they were interpreted by the author of the book of Jeremiah. Jeremiah's calls are designed according to the principle of measure for measure; the prophet is described as God's messenger who is worthy of being protected; and finally Jeremiah is conceived as trying to let justice be shown.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: Biblische Zeitschrift
In: The Book of Jeremiah
In: The Book of Jeremiah
Author:

Abstract

The paper focuses on the way in which the ancient Jewish historian rewrote the David-Bathsheba narrative. It discusses the subject against the backdrop of the biblical text and its traditional rabbinic interpretations, and demonstrates that although it posed a great challenge to Josephus’ generally positive view of King David, the author of the Antiquities of the Jews decided to retain most of the problematic source material (with minor changes) and to confront it head-on. The article uncovers Josephus’ techniques when rewriting this narrative and tries to understand the reasons behind the changes he introduced.

In: The Character of David in Judaism, Christianity and Islam
Author:

Abstract

It is well-known that there are no detailed descriptions of the physical beauty of specific characters in the Bible. Despite this “disclaimer”, we seek to treat descriptions of such beauty in the books of Samuel and Kings in this article as they are manifested in stories of male (Saul, Eliab, David, Absalom, and Adonijah) and female figures (Abigail, Bathsheba, Tamar, and Abishag the Shunammite). We shall attempt to answer the following questions: What are the opinions of the authors of Samuel and Kings on physical appearance? Is a distinction drawn between masculine and feminine beauty? What are the purposes of pointing out a specific character's physical beauty? An analysis of the Biblical convocations is conducted according to the literary approach. The article focuses on methods used to cast the characters and on analogies between the various stories, and tries to draw conclusions regarding trends in the books of Samuel and Kings, as well as on the homogeneity of Deuteronomistic history.

In: Vetus Testamentum
Author:

Abstract

This article re-examines Josephus’ dealing with the biblical miracles. It challenges the view of Feldman and others who argued that Josephus had downplayed the place of miracles in his writings to meet the needs of his intended audience. These scholars failed to define miracles and thus erroneously classified certain stories as miraculous and overlooked narratives that should indeed be classified as miraculous on the other. The main issues analysed were the omissions of miracle stories and the question of rationalization. My conclusion is that Josephus did not significantly deviate from the biblical record when he retold miracle stories.

In: Zutot
Author:

Abstract

This essay tries to uncover the reason for the omission of Moses from the Passover haggadah. According to my interpretation, the editors of the haggadah expressed an opinion on an issue which already occupied the authors of the Biblical stories. Integrating Moses' name intensively in the haggadah may have blurred the viewpoint that wishes to attribute miracles solely to God.

In: Horizons in Biblical Theology