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Abstract

This contribution focuses on contemporary dilemmas and future challenges of what has been typically described as ‘nature conservation’. In Africa, nature conservation has often been synonymous with the protection of ‘wildlife’, while the protection of forests, rivers, and soils has been organized in different ways. Wildlife conservation in Africa has typically rested on the enclosure of protected areas, decoupling previously linked lifeworlds. Critiques of ‘fortress’ conservation have resulted in new approaches to co-management, joint ownership, public–private partnerships and working landscapes of conservation in the first decades of the twenty-first century. The engagement of global capital and international expertise to safeguard ever larger rural areas and provide connectivity via corridors, is a hallmark of contemporary conservation. This contribution examines contemporary conservation approaches and focuses on intense controversies about how conservation can be participatory, socially and economically meaningful, and ecologically efficient at the same time.

Open Access
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
In: African Futures
The essays in this collection are written to make readers (re)consider what is possible in Africa. The essays shake the tree of received wisdom and received categories, and hone in on the complexities of life under ecological and economic constraints. Yet, throughout this volume, people do not emerge as victims, but rather as inventors, engineers, scientists, planners, writers, artists, and activists, or as children, mothers, fathers, friends, or lovers – all as future-makers. It is precisely through agents such as these that Africa is futuring: rethinking, living, confronting, imagining, and relating in the light of its many emerging tomorrows.