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Michael Dillon

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Michael Dillon

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Series:

Michael Dillon

China’s economic development has become a matter of world-wide interest since the boom that began in the 1980s. Key Papers in Chinese Economic History since 1949 offers a selection of outstanding articles that trace the origins of the modern Chinese economy. Topics covered include agriculture and the rural economy; industrialisation and urbanisation; finance and capital; political economy and international connections.
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Edited by Michael Dillon

The development of China’s economy has long been an enigma to Western historians. Did it consist of centuries of stagnation followed by a period of collapse or was it a process of steady development, reaching a high point by the eighteenth century? What is certain is that China’s economic growth never developed into a full industrial revolution and China was overtaken by the West, but the reasons for this are highly contested both within and outside China. Topics of the Key Papers here include land use and land ownership, handicraft industries and early industrialization, trade and commerce, transport and communication and taxation and finance. It begins with papers on the earliest development of the economy in the Qin and Han dynasties, but concentrates on the periods of greatest interest and most significant development, namely the commercial revolution of the Song dynasty, the industrial and commercial expansion of the mid-Ming and the impact of Western and Japanese trade and investment in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
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Edited by Michael Dillon

The focus here is on the Chinese speaking Muslims known as the Hui or Huihui, their religion and communities being found mainly in northwest and southeast China. The contents include papers on the conflict between Muslim groups, and between Muslims and the Chinese state in imperial times, culminating in the communal violence and rebellion of the 1860s. Other subjects include the contact between Christian missionaries and Muslims, Japan’s policies towards the Hui Muslims during the Second World War, and the Chinese Communist Party’s policy on national minorities as it affects Muslims. Islam has had a presence in China since the earliest years of the religion, initially with the itinerant populations of traders and diplomats from the heartland of the Islamic world on the periphery of China. Subsequently, migration and intermarriage created settled communities.
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Michael Dillon

Islam remains central to the identity of the Uyghurs of southern Xinjiang. This article focuses on the cities of Kashgar and Khotan in the early twenty-first century and, on the basis of fieldwork, examines aspects of religious practice and tensions between the Uyghurs and the Chinese state. In Kashgar the old Uyghur Town has been physically destroyed, historical religious monuments have been secularized but smaller mosques have active congregations. In the Khotan region, the annual Imam Asim shrine festival takes place openly and active worship continues in village mosques. In an increasingly violent region, tension will continue between the religious requirements of the Uyghurs and the Chinese state’s insistence on associating all Islamic practice, particularly independent practice, with extremism and terrorism.