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Essays on the Rights of the Child
Author: Michael Freeman
With the passing of the UN Convention in 1989 children's rights have been placed firmly on the political agenda. This book explores a variety of children's rights issues from the Convention and beyond. It examines the moral foundations of children's rights issues from the Convention and beyond, and offers insights into children's rights issues both old and new. Amongst the subjects covered are the history of children's rights, empowerment, cultural pluralism, sexual abuse, contact as a child's right, the reproduction revolution and the child's right to identity, and children's rights in the context of English law. This is a book which those interested in children, children's issues and children's rights will find stimulating and rewarding.
The author is a Professor of English Law at University College London, a barrister and the author of thirty books including, The Rights and The Wrongs of Children, Children's Rights: A Comparative Perspective, Children, Their Families and The Law and Violence In the Home: A Socio-Legal Study. He is the founding co-editor of the International Journal of Children's Rights, the editor of Current Legal Problems and a former editor of the Annual Survey of Family Law. A prominent advocate of children's rights for over 20 years, he has lectured widely on the subject.
Editor: Michael Freeman
This collection of essays by a variety of scholars, compiled to celebrate the silver anniversary of The International Journal of Children’s Rights, builds on work already in the literature to reveal where we are now at and how the law concerned with children is reacting to new developments. New, or relatively new subject matter is explored, such as film classification, intersex genital mutilation, the right to development. Rights within the context of sport are given an airing. We are offered new perspectives on discipline, on the significance of “rights flowing downhill,” on the so-called “General Principles.“ The uses to which the CRC is put in legal reasoning in some legal systems is critically examined. Though not intended as an audit, the collection offers a fascinating image of where the field of children's right is at now, the progress that has been made, and what issues will require work in the future.
Editor: Michael Freeman
This volume is in part intended to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. We are now a generation on from its formulation, and, as this varied collection of articles by leading thinkers in the field reflects, children's rights have come a long way. Yet the aim of this volume is not to look back, but to take stock and look forward. It explores subjects as diverse as socio-economic rights, corporal punishment, language and scientific progress as they relate to children and their rights, and offers new insights and new ideas. Edited by one of the most respected and leading scholars in the field, The Future of Children's Rights constitutes a stimulating and useful resource for academics and practitioners alike.
Author: Michael Freeman
This volume constitutes a commentary on Article 3 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. It is part of the series, A Commentary on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, which provides an article by article analysis of all substantive, organizational and procedural provisions of the CRC and its two Optional Protocols. For every article, a comparison with related human rights provisions is made, followed by an in-depth exploration of the nature and scope of State obligations deriving from that article. The series constitutes an essential tool for actors in the field of children’s rights, including academics, students, judges, grassroots workers, governmental, non- governmental and international officers. The series is sponsored by the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office.
Essays from the International Journal of Children's Rights
Editor: Michael Freeman
More has been written about children, childhood and children’s rights in the last 20 years than in the rest of history. There are more university courses focusing on children now than ever before.
The International Journal of Children’s Rights has been a major player in all this. Its impact is worldwide. It has established itself as the leading journal in the field. The journal is now in its 19th year, and is flourishing. This volume has been compiled not only to commemorate the journal’s work, but also the 20th anniversary of the Convention coming into operation, and of the first World Summit on Children. An anthology of the best articles published in these formative years, this volume offers a representative sample of what the journal has achieved. Some of the articles are ones which are frequently cited, whilst others are less well known; some deal with theory, others with practice. The case for children’s rights is to be found throughout this collection, as is the history of children’s rights. Some articles are devoted to the UN Convention, others cover a wide selection of issues relating to different children’s rights, ranging from children and religion, the relationship between women and children, to children and health, and how children perceive their rights.
Author: Michael Freeman
Despite the hundreds of books and scholarly articles which have been devoted to him, François Villon remains a mysterious figure who, in the words of the sort of paradox he applies to himself, appears both near yet far. Near because he seems to articulate feelings to which readers down the ages have been able to respond, far because the world he lived in seems to a modern reader a tantalizingly foreign one. No analysis of the poet's work is complete without some description of that world in all its physical and mental strangeness. This new book will also show how Villon consciously fashioned his own image, manipulating his original readers and offering them a version of himself and his talents designed to amuse, impress, move and perhaps deceive. For he had been a villain as well as a poet, and he uses selected episodes from his past together with a very personal treatment of the great literary and moral themes of his age not only to express his own conflicting emotions but also to demonstrate that he is a reformed man who needs and deserves sympathy and understanding. This consummate artist comes across in his deliberately ambiguous work as a loveable rogue, by turns jaunty and maudlin. The baffling persona he created raises many questions. The author of the present study looks in particular at the reception of Villon's work in his own day, suggesting that it was meant to be presented (and perhaps performed) as part of a process of rehabilitation and a return to the fold he had been forced to leave by his own behaviour. The poet's work might thus help him achieve social acceptance and the longed-for ‘maison et couche molle’. However, events on the streets of Paris in late 1462 would silence his voice forever.
Editor: Michael Freeman
This collection offers a series of essays highlighting many of the most controversial of contemporary issues relating to children, medicine and health care including the participation rights of children, genetic testing, male circumcision, organ donation, gender reassignment, the rights of autistic children, anorexia nervosa. Essays are written by a range of leading scholars across a range of disciplines. A number of the essays in this collection were previously published in the International Journal of Children's Rights.
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights
In: The International Journal of Children's Rights