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In Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy, Michael Glowasky offers an account of how Augustine's pastoral concerns shape the rhetorical strategy in his Sermones ad populum. While it has been widely recognized that Augustine draws on classical rhetoric in his sermons, how his use of rhetoric in his Sermones relates to his pastoral theology has yet to be addressed. Through careful examination of Augustine’s preaching practice, this book provides the most comprehensive account of Augustine’s homiletic strategy in his Sermones to date. As such, it helps us better appreciate the value of the Sermones ad populum as a work in its own right, while at the same time advancing our understanding of Augustine as a preacher, teacher, and pastor.
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy
In: Rhetoric and Scripture in Augustine’s Homiletic Strategy

Abstract

Augustine discusses Exodus 3:14-15 on 49 different occasions in his written corpus, 14 of which are found in his Enarrationes in Psalmos. Scholars have been quick to note the importance of God’s self-disclosure as I AM in verse 14 for Augustine’s conception of the divine as esse. However, far less attention has been paid to the place of verse 15 in Augustine’s thought, despite his claim that this verse reveals God’s “other name” (aliud nomen): the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. In this article, I discuss four key passages from his Enarrationes in Psalmos – two from the redemptive-historical psalms and two from the psalms of ascent – where Augustine addresses the relationship between the two divine names God reveals to Moses in Exodus 3:14-15. In these four passages, I suggest, Augustine presents temporality and materiality as ongoing necessities for the knowledge of God, despite what he appears to suggest elsewhere.

Open Access
In: Scrinium
In: Vigiliae Christianae