Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 27 items for

  • Author or Editor: Michael H. Molenda x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

Abstract

Richard “Dick” Clark is probably best known in the educational media community as a critic of the theory that media have direct causative influence on specific types of learning, touching off a controversy summarized as the “media-methods debate,” which continued through the 1980s and 1990s. Clark has devoted his efforts since then to exploring what does work, studying human cognition, instructional methods, instructional design processes, motivation theory, and performance interventions. He has become one of the most influential scholars in educational psychology and technology.

In: AECT at 100
In: AECT at 100

Abstract

Charles F. “Charlie” Schuller was an educator who saw educational media as a tool educators could wield to increase productivity within educational institutions from K-12 schools through the university level. Over his nearly 50-year career he contributed immeasurably to the advancement, first, of audio-visual media—including a major textbook on the topic, and later of instructional design and technology in schools, higher education, and the military. In 1958–59 he served as president of the Department of Audio-Visual Instruction (DAVI), the predecessor of AECT. He had a hand in virtually all the major movements in educational media from the 1950s through the 1970s, at Michigan State University and around the US.

In: AECT at 100

Abstract

Edgar Dale was a research professor at Ohio State University and prolific scholar in the field of audiovisual education from 1929 to 1970. By 1937, when he served a term as president of the Department of Visual Instruction (DVI), the predecessor to AECT, he was well known internationally for his studies of children’s experiences with film, readability of text, and the development of print and media literacy programs. He is most famous, however, for his celebrated textbook, Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching (Dale, 1946), in which he used “the Cone of Experience” as a conceptual framework. Throughout the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s, he continued to advocate for a holistic approach to education, with film and other media being integrated into an organized system.

In: AECT at 100

Abstract

Charles F. Hoban, Jr. was recognized as one of the leading experts in the field of educational film from the 1930s through the 1960s. He was the Director of the Motion Picture Project that laid the foundation for what became a national movement for the incorporation of film and other visual media into educational curricula. Throughout his career, he remained the leading authority on the use of film in education, and he also championed emerging developments that became central to the field of educational technology.

In: AECT at 100

Abstract

F. Dean McClusky was a pioneer in the earliest days of the nascent visual education field, and he found himself at the center of the stage during the formative years of the audiovisual education profession, from the 1920s through the 1950s, serving as president of the Department of Audio-Visual Instruction (DAVI) in 1948–1949. Throughout that period, he was prominent as a researcher, writer, and “linker” between the AV profession and its allies in commercial film and philanthropy.

In: AECT at 100

Abstract

Richard B. “Dick” Lewis was a prominent advocate and administrator of audiovisual media throughout the 1950s and 1960s. He established an innovative AV service program, among the first to incorporate television services and custom-made materials production—a program emulated by many other colleges in California and across the nation.

In: AECT at 100

Abstract

The first half-century of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) begins with its founding in 1923 as the Department of Visual Instruction (DVI) of the National Education Association (NEA). From the founding, through the Great Depression, and into the years of World War II, the organization struggled to gain members and build an infrastructure. The post-war boom period brought new energy to the Visual Education movement. Massive federal investments in the 1950s and 1960s provided the means for what had become the Department of Audiovisual Instruction (DAVI) to attain its largest membership and its greatest impact on the emerging field of educational technology.

In: AECT at 100
In: AECT at 100

Abstract

Anna L. Hyer, as executive secretary of the Department of Audio-Visual Instruction (DAVI) and later director of the Division of Educational Technology of the National Education Association, was the most prominent formal leader of the audiovisual movement from the 1950s to the 1970s. She was also a thought leader, penning many editorials on the role of technology in schools. There were other women making important contributions in school and university audiovisual centers, but Anna was renowned in her time as being “the most powerful woman in a ‘man’s field.’”

In: AECT at 100