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Michael O'Flaherty

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The war in Bosnia and Herzegovina was characterized by human rights abuses on a scale not seen in Europe since the Second World War. It is not then surprising that the Dayton Agreement, together with related texts and agreements, lays out the most ambitious human rights protection regime ever included within an international peace settlement. The peace agreement imports myriad substantive guarantees for the protection of every category of human rights, including some through a novel application of the European Convention on Human Rights. The provisions are accompanied by a highly complex system for both monitoring and enforcement of their implementation. These enforcement procedures contain temporary elements, such as international field operations, and an array of tribunals and institutions intended to be permanent.
The present volume is a contribution to the process of interpreting and assessing the post-Dayton human rights regime in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The analysis of the contributing human rights scholars and practitioners is located within the contexts of the immediate reality and needs of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the systemic significance of the peace agreement for other post-conflict and complex emergency situations worldwide.
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Michael O’Flaherty, Zdzisław Kędzia, Amrei Müller and George Ulrich

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This collection of essays explores the notion, tools and challenges of human rights diplomacy, which is understood as the utilisation of diplomatic negotiation and persuasion for the specific purpose of promoting and protecting human rights. Theoretical reflections are combined with first-hand accounts from a range of policy-makers involved in human rights diplomacy at the bilateral, regional and multilateral (UN) level. Contributors include inter-governmentally appointed office-holders, human rights ambassadors, members of UN human rights treaty bodies and representatives of inter-governmental organisations, national human rights organisations and non-governmental organisations. Their analysis shows that skilful and principled diplomacy can become a crucial part of a holistic approach to human rights protection, complementing other means such as legal remedies, public advocacy, political pressure and technical assistance. This book builds on discussions at a high-level workshop on the topic, organised by the University of Nottingham Human Rights Law Centre, the European Inter-University Centre for Human Rights and Democratisation and the Adam Mickiewicz University of Poznań.