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  • Author or Editor: Michael Peterson x

Luca Surian, Candida Peterson, Michael Siegal and Carol Nemeroff

Abstract

In this study, we examined the extent to which young children can be influenced by the perceived blessed status of an actor in their evaluations of behavior as a lie or mistake. Children aged 4 and 5 years attending Catholic schools in an urban center in Northern Italy were provided with a situation in which two girls in church were blessed with holy water ("blessed condition") or shook the priest's hand ("not blessed"). The girls were then placed in a setting in which each told a third girl that contaminated juice was good to drink: one deliberately lied and the other had no knowledge of the contaminant and made a mistake. Significantly more children judged both girls to have made a mistake in the blessed condition than in the not blessed condition. Their accuracy in distinguishing mistakes from lies in the not blessed condition resembled that reported in previous research in which traits such as blessedness (or its absence) were not assigned to the perpetrators. Thus children often perceived lying as uncharacteristic of the blessed whereas they applied the definition of lying as involving intentional falsehood for the not blessed. The results are discussed in terms of an early cultural cognition that involves beliefs about processes of purification and positive contagion.

Habits in Mind

Integrating Theology, Philosophy, and the Cognitive Science of Virtue, Emotion, and Character Formation

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Edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James van Slyke, Michael Spezio and Kevin Reimer

The language of habit plays a central role in traditional accounts of the virtues, yet it has received only modest attention among contemporary scholars of philosophy, psychology, and religion. This volume explores the role of both “mere habits” and sophisticated habitus in the moral life. Beginning with an essay by Stanley Hauerwas and edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio, and Kevin S. Reimer, the volume explores the history of the virtues and habit in Christian thought, the contributions that psychology and neuroscience make to our understanding of habitus, freedom, and character formation, and the relation of habit and habitus to contemporary philosophical and theological accounts of character formation and the moral life.

Contributors are: Joseph Bankard, Dennis Bielfeldt, Craig Boyd, Charlene Burns, Mark Graves, Brian Green, Stanley Hauerwas, Todd Junkins, Adam Martin, Darcia Narvaez, Gregory R. Peterson, Kevin S. Reimer, Lynn C. Reimer, Michael L. Spezio, Kevin Timpe, and George Tsakiridis.

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Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer

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Edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer

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Edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer

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Edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer

Series:

Edited by Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer

Series:

Gregory R. Peterson, James A. Van Slyke, Michael L. Spezio and Kevin S. Reimer