Search Results

Graham Taylor and Michael Neary

Abstract

We live in an age dominated by money. As capitalism has intensified and expanded as a social form, money has increasingly colonised the production and reproduction of the human condition. We live in an age of monetarism: an age in which social and political regulation are increasingly subordinate to the dictates of ‘sound money'. We live in an age of national lotteries: an age where millions attempt each week to garner enough money to ‘free’ themselves from the grinding agony of wage labour. We live in an age in which people increasingly grasp the alienation inherent in the domination of society by money and attempt to reassert a sense of human community through the introduction of local currency and barter schemes. But we also live in an age where Marxism is supposedly dead; where we can only gaze in ironic postmodern wonder at the increasing domination of the human condition by money and its social forms. In this paper we go beyond this postmodern orthodoxy to suggest that it is not only possible to develop a historically materialist analysis of money and its social forms but also that this project is essential if we are to reclaim our humanity from the deadening alienation of money and its social forms. We explore the magical qualities of money, the qualities which have enthralled and transfixed bourgeois social science from the classical economy of Adam Smith to the present day postmodernists. We argue that the lasting legacy of Marx was to uncover the historical materiality underlying the magical appearance of money: a discovery of the alchemic properties of money capital through which money becomes more money and which involves the material subordination of living labour to the valorisation of money capital.

Michael A. Millay, Thomas N. Taylor and Edith L. Taylor

Primary anatomy and secondary development is described for two root types from the Fremouw Peak locality (Transantarctic Mts, Antarctica) of early to middle Triassic age. Roots of Antarcticycas have a bilayered cortex with thick surface cuticle, diarch xylem, and a clearIy defined endodermis surrounded by a single cell layer possessing phi thickenings. Secondary development begins with phellern and phelloderm production from the out er primary phloem position, and is followed bya bifacial vascular cambium next to the primary xylem that pro duces sieve cells and ray parenchyma to the outside. Young roots of Antarcticoxylon are similar to those of Antarcticycas, but may possess 2-3 cell layers with phi thickenings. Secondary development from a bifacial vascular cambium produces alternating bands of sieve cells and phloem parenchyma cells in the secondary phloem and wood with uniseriate rays and scattered axial parenchyma. The presence of phi thickenings and an epidermal cutieie in both roots suggests environmental stress related to water regulation. The occurrence of phi thickenings in the roots of some conifers, angiosperms, a fossil cycad and a probable seed fern suggests this character is of ecological rather than phylogenetic significance.

Frances Quinn, Michael Littledyke and Neil Taylor

Series:

Edited by Michael Taylor, Helmut Schreier and Paulo Ghiraldelli

Series:

Edited by Michael Taylor, Helmut Schreier and Paulo Ghiraldelli