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Does Marxism possess an ethical impulse? Is there a moral foundation that underpins the Marxist critique of capitalism and the vision for social progress? The essays collected in Constructing Marxist Ethics: Critique, Normativity, Praxis argue that there is such an ethical grounding for Marxist theory. The essays, each from different vantage points, construct what a Marxian ethics should look like: what kind of values should be at the heart of the Marxian enterprise.

Contributors are: Dan Albanese, Paul Blackledge, Bob Cannon, Tony Burns, Ian Fraser, Ruth Groff, Wadood Hamad, Christoph Henning, Peter Hudis, Lauren Langman, George E. McCarthy, Sean Sayers, Michael J. Thompson, and Lawrence Wilde.
Georg Lukács was one of the most important intellectuals and philosophers of the 20th century. His last great work was an systematic social ontology that was an attempt to ground an ethical and critical form of Marxism. This work has only now begun to attract the interest of critical theorists and philosophers intent on reconstructing a critical theory of society as well as a more sophisticated framework for Marxian philosophy. This collection of essays explores the concept of critical social ontology as it was outlined by Georg Lukács and the ways that his ideas can help us construct a more grounded and socially relevant form of social critique.

This work will of special interest to social, moral and political philosophers as well as those who study critical theory, social theory and Marxism. It is also of interest to those working within the area of social ontology.

Contributors include: Mario Duayer, Andreas Giesbert, Christoph Henning, Antonino Infranca, Reha Kadakal, Endre Kiss, Michael Morris, Michalis Skomvoulis, Matthew J. Smetona, Titus Stahl, Thomas Telios, Michael J. Thompson, Murillo van der Laan, Miguel Vedda, Claudius Vellay.
In: Constructing Marxist Ethics

Abstract

Over the last few decades, the cultural-historical theory of the Russian educational psychologist Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky has provided a rich resource for the development of educational theory and practice across the world (). This chapter highlights key aspects of its connections with the more recent ideas developed around threshold concepts, with a view to further developing research and practice in the field. Three intersections between Vygotskian and threshold concepts theoretical frameworks that illuminate the edge of conceptual understanding are examined – conceptual learning as a system, language and thinking, and the zone of proximal development and the liminal space.

In: Threshold Concepts on the Edge
In: Georg Lukács and the Possibility of Critical Social Ontology
In: Georg Lukács and the Possibility of Critical Social Ontology