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Brill’s Encyclopedia of Global Pentecostalism Online (BEGP) provides a comprehensive overview of worldwide Pentecostalism from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It offers analysis at the level of specific countries and regions, historical figures, movements and organizations, and particular topics and themes.
Pentecostal Studies draws upon areas of research such as anthropology, biblical studies, economics, gender studies, global studies, history, political science, sociology, theological studies, and other areas of related interest. The BEGP emphasizes this multi-disciplinary approach and includes scholarship from a range of disciplines, methods, and theoretical perspectives. Moreover, the BEGP is cross-cultural and transnational, including contributors from around the world to represent key insights on Pentecostalism from a range of countries and regions.
Providing summaries of the key literature, the BEGP will be the standard reference for Pentecostal Studies. All articles are fully text searchable and cross-referenced, with bibliographic information on scholarly work and recommendations for further reading.

• 62 important themes & topics in Pentecostalism
• Biographies of 129 historical figures
• Ca. 70 Pentecostal Movements & Organizations
• Development of Pentecostalism in 78 countries
• 5 Regional articles: Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Latin-America
This volume contributes to the growing body of literature on religion and globalization and specifically global Pentecostal movements. While Pentecostalism worldwide shares a cultural resemblance, it is also localized and expressed in different ways. The variety of Pentecostalisms throughout the world are illustrated through important themes of mission, migration, and public religion. The global flows of Pentecostal practices, beliefs, and cultures, brings into contrast these variations. Negotiating what it means to be Pentecostal often leads to conflict and questions of identity. Interaction with other religions like Islam in Africa, mission work in Asia, and migration to Europe and North America is problematized. Regional coverage includes Africa, Asia, Latin America, Europe, and North America.
Editor-in-Chief: Michael Wilkinson
Brill’s Encyclopedia of Global Pentecostalism (BEGP) provides a comprehensive overview of worldwide Pentecostalism from a range of disciplinary perspectives. It offers analysis at the level of specific countries and regions, historical figures, movements and organizations, and particular topics and themes. The online version of the Encyclopedia is already available. See here.

Pentecostal Studies draws upon areas of research such as anthropology, biblical studies, economics, gender studies, global studies, history, political science, sociology, theological studies, and other areas of related interest. The BEGP emphasizes this multi-disciplinary approach and includes scholarship from a range of disciplines, methods, and theoretical perspectives. Moreover, the BEGP is cross-cultural and transnational, including contributors from around the world to represent key insights on Pentecostalism from a range of countries and regions.
Providing summaries of the key literature, the BEGP will be the standard reference for Pentecostal Studies. All articles are organized alphabetically with bibliographic information on scholarly work and directions for further reading.

• 62 important themes & topics in Pentecostalism
• Biographies of 129 historical figures
• Ca. 70 Pentecostal Movements & Organizations
• Development of Pentecostalism in 78 countries
• 5 Regional articles: Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, Latin-America

Abstract

There is much confusion over what is meant by globalization generally and specifically as it is applied to the study of Pentecostalism. In this article I show how the different usages of globalization are applied to several areas of Pentecostal research demonstrating that what is 'global' is mostly linked with the modernization and secularization debates. Another view of globalization is then presented with application to Pentecostalism. Specifically, I show how Pentecostalism is shaped by the globalization of religion(s) and heightens theologizing as it pertains to orthodoxy, orthopraxy, authenticity, and authority. Finally, North American scholars of Pentecostalism need to examine further how their own theologizing is shaped by globalizing trends.

In: Journal of Pentecostal Theology
In: Pneuma
In: Pneuma
In: Pneuma

This article offers a sociological examination of the role of networks among charismatic Christians, with specific attention to Catch the Fire and the Revival Alliance. Drawing upon social network theory, it shows how religious networks in global society are relational, asymmetrical, and infused with apostolic authority. A case study of Catch the Fire reveals that the network is primarily collaborative in its structure. However, there are some relationships in the network that are more important than others, as evidenced by the dense social ties among members. Furthermore, the network is structured according to gender with the benefits of social capital favoring men. The network also overlaps with other networks through key relationships, especially the New Apostolic Reformation and other charismatic ministries associated with the prosperity gospel.

In: Pneuma

This article raises a number of theoretical and methodological issues for studying global Pentecostalism. More specifically, it examines a range of internal debates among Pentecostals about the nature of orthodoxy, orthopraxy, and orthopathy, including related questions about authority and authenticity. The argument maintained in this article is that globalization and the development of global society is uneven and all religions, including Pentecostalism, are attempting to come to terms with the meaning of social change and the role of religion. This can be observed through a range of social interactions, such as those among Pentecostals about the process of social change, the nature of global society, and the role of religion. A number of cases are presented to examine these cultural debates among Pentecostals, including a discussion of the implications for Pentecostal scholarship. The article concludes with a series of methodological questions for scholars of Pentecostalism.

In: Pneuma