No Access

Official History in Modern Indonesia

New Order Perceptions and Counterviews

Michael Wood

Dealing with New Order perceptions of the past this study gives insights into how the past can be used for purposes of national-building and regime legitimization and into the nature of the New Order. The Suharto regime created a coherent history that is reflected in recent archaeological and historical research, in popular histories and biographies, in monuments and in school textbooks.
The author describes an official history stretching from the proto-Indonesia of Majapahit, through the Indonesian Revolution up to the birth of the New Order in 1965. This past emphasized political stability and national unity under the guidance of the military; socially disruptive ideas were to be avoided. He also gives a counterview to this history stressing Indonesia’s place in the larger Islamic world.
No Access

Michael Woods

No Access

Series:

Michael Wood

Abstract

The international law on the use of force is recalled, as is the controversy, among academics in particular, about the right to use force in self-defence against non-State armed groups. The question of anticipatory self-defence and the related notion of imminence is considered in the context of the use of force against non-State armed groups. An attempt is then made to describe how the jus ad bellum applies to the use of force against Da‘esh, primarily in Syria. Finally, the 2016 report of the UK Parliament’s Joint Committee on Human Rights on ‘the Government’s policy on the use of drones for targeted killings’ is briefly considered.