Abstract

Using ceramic evidence, this paper examines the differences between the supply of coastal and inland regions of Africa from the 4th to 7th c. A.D. While a narrow band of coastline across the Mediterranean seems to be fully integrated into a common system of consumption (e.g. importing overseas amphora and the principal African Red Slip (ARS) forms), most of the inland regions seem to be more impervious to non-regional products (e.g. no transport amphorae and mainly local ARS); this is a situation which is particularly obvious in the Algerian high plains. Nevertheless, an accurate analysis of the documentation allows us to discern some indications of inter-provincial contacts via ancient east-west terrestrial routes.

In: Late Antique Archaeology

This paper examines the evolution of late antique ceramic production in Africa, pointing to continuity and change in morphology, technology and economy. Throughout this period, African ceramic shapes retained Punic traits, and remained firmly anchored in Roman tradition, but also seem to have been influenced by some new Byzantine patterns. Technology did not change radically, but there were some slight changes (impoverishment?) in the production of existing objects. The most obvious changes entailed a short distance transfer of amphora production sites from city suburbs to the countryside and to town centres, as well as a long distance transfer of Red Slip Ware workshops from Zeugitana, to Byzacena and then back to Zeugitana, to the region around Carthage.

In: Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

Using ceramic evidence, this paper examines the differences between the supply of coastal and inland regions of Africa from the 4th to 7th c. A.D. While a narrow band of coastline across the Mediterranean seems to be fully integrated into a common system of consumption (e.g. importing overseas amphora and the principal African Red Slip (ARS) forms), most of the inland regions seem to be more impervious to non-regional products (e.g. no transport amphorae and mainly local ARS); this is a situation which is particularly obvious in the Algerian high plains. Nevertheless, an accurate analysis of the documentation allows us to discern some indications of inter-provincial contacts via ancient east-west terrestrial routes.

In: Local Economies?
In: Technology in Transition A.D. 300-650