Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Miguel Villanueva Svensson x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
The development of the prosodic system from Indo-European to Balto-Slavic is dominated by two major innovations: the rise of mobility and the rise of acuteness. This book provides a new account of the latter. It stands out from previous works for being informed by recent advances in phonological typology and tonogenesis and, especially, for its comprehensiveness. All matters related to the rise of acuteness are treated in detail. As a result, the book includes new insights on several issues of Balto-Slavic historical phonology and morphology as well.

Abstract

It is now generally agreed upon that the Indo-European simple thematic presents are a post-Anatolian innovation. The origin of this formation, however, remains unclear. In this paper it is argued that the initial core of simple thematic presents was of denominative origin. They go back to an early Core PIE class of denominatives derived from e-grade thematic adjectives through conversion, e.g., adj. *léu̯k-o- ‘clear’ (Gk. λευκός ‘white’) → vb. *léu̯k-e/o- ‘be/make clear’ (Ved. rócate ‘shines’, TB lyuśtär ‘will light up’). This derivational pattern became obsolete already within Core PIE and a number of original denominatives like *léu̯k-e/o- were reinterpreted as primary present stems.

Open Access
In: Indo-European Linguistics

Abstract

This article presents a new approach to the Baltic and Balto-Slavic infinitive system. It is argued that the traditional view (which, in essence, derives the Slavic infinitive -ti from PIE loc. sg. *-tēi̯ and projects all Baltic infinitive endings back into Balto-Slavic) is for several reasons problematic. Balto-Slavic possessed just one infinitive (OCS -ti, Lith. -ti < Bl.-Sl. *- < PIE dat. sg. *-tei̯-ei̯, as per Hill 2016) and a supine (OCS -t ъ, Lith. - < Bl.-Sl. *-tun < PIE acc. sg. *-tum). All other infinitive endings of Baltic (OPr. -twei, Lith. dial. -tie, Latv. refl. -tiê-s) were an exclusive creation of this branch. The reasons for the expansion of the infinitive in Baltic are also discussed.

Open Access
In: Indo-European Linguistics