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The USIA and American Cold War Propaganda in Sweden, 1952-1969
Author: Mikael Nilsson
Mikael Nilsson offers a detailed and groundbreaking analysis of how the United States Information Agency (USIA) conducted its wide-ranging propaganda campaign in Sweden during the Cold War, 1952–1969. The USIA placed propaganda in the Swedish press, radio, and television as well as schools and universities and established connections to labour leaders, government officials, and journalists. The book also details how the U.S. military financed research at Swedish universities. Nilsson shows how Swedish journalists, scientists, and government officials assisted the USIA in its propaganda efforts --- i.e., co-produced U.S. hegemony in Sweden. The book highlights both the width and the limits of USIA’s propaganda and also relates this theme to Swedish security policy and the secret military cooperation between Sweden and the United States.
Author: Mikael Nilsson

This article investigates the attitude to communism, National Socialism, Fascism, and authoritarian conservatism in the Swedish Catholic Church’s journal Credo from 1922 to 1945. The comparative approach has made it possible to see how the journal distinguished between the various forms of authoritarian ideologies in Europe during this period. The article shows that the Catholic Church in Sweden took a very negative view of communism (the Soviet Union and the Spanish Republic) and strongly condemned it throughout the period, while it took a largely very positive stance towards Fascism (Italy) and Authoritarian Conservativism (Spain and Portugal). In the case of National Socialism (Nazi Germany) the attitude was more diverse. Credo was largely negative towards National Socialism but only because it was thought to threaten Catholics and Catholicism in Germany. However, Credo never criticized discrimination and genocidal violence against the Jews.

In: Fascism
Author: Mikael Nilsson

This article provides an updated and comprehensive historiography of Swedish military history research concerning Sweden’s security policy during the Cold War for an international audience in the English language. The article reviews the important books and articles on the subject from the early 1990s to the present and evaluates them in an accessible way also for those not familiar with Swedish Cold War history. The article identifies and makes use of three schools of research in order to categorize and systemize this research, namely a moderate school, a critical school, and a radical school. One of the main points of the article is that much of the differences between the critical and the radical school has to do with the fact that the two schools focus on different levels of analysis and thus in reality are more compatible than their proponents may think.

In: International Bibliography of Military History
In: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North
In: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North
In: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North
In: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North
In: The Battle for Hearts and Minds in the High North