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Author: Mikko Posti
In Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350 Mikko Posti presents a historical and philosophical study of the doctrine of divine providence in 13th- and 14th-century Latin philosophical theology. In addition to offering a fresh and engaging reading of Thomas Aquinas’s ideas concerning providence, Posti focuses on Siger of Brabant, Peter Auriol and Thomas Bradwardine, among others.
The book also provides an extended treatment of the relatively little-known 13th-century work Liber de bona fortuna, consisting of Latin translations of chapters found originally in Aristotle’s Ethica Eudemia and Magna moralia. In their treatments of Liber de bona fortuna, the medieval theologians provided philosophically interesting explanations of good fortune and its relationship to divine providence.
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350
In: Medieval Theories of Divine Providence 1250-1350

Abstract

This chapter deals with the long-lasting debates on the meaning and legitimation of the concept of dominion (dominium) and dominion rights among heretics and infidels by focusing especially on two questions: how did theological theory in effect lead to the marginalization of people who are not part of the true faith or righteous elect, also in terms of politics, and second how might political theory be able to recognize the rights of individuals at the margins, including infidels? The chapter deals with these questions by analyzing, first, the notion of dominion rights among the 14th-century Augustinian theologians who followed the Hostiensian line of interpretation of grace-based dominion, and second, the 16th-century Spanish Dominican theologians, whose arguments offered an opposed view by maintaining that all rational human beings can possess dominion rights. All the authors whose views are covered here (e.g. Hostiensis, Giles of Rome, Richard FitzRalph, John Wyclif, and Francisco Vitoria) aligned themselves with the long interpretative tradition of the notion of dominion starting already from early 13th-century juridical and theological thinking.

In: Rights at the Margins