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  • Author or Editor: Modimowabarwa Kanyane x
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Abstract

After close to three decades of democracy, South Africa cannot be expected to achieve what other countries took many years to accomplish. However, South Africa was supposed to learn from the pitfalls of the post-colonial states that emerged from colonialism. Regrettably, that was not the case. Instead, it followed the same trajectory of many post-colonial countries entangled in selfish interests and corruption. Western epistemologies shaped the South African democracy that was born in 1994. Today, apartheid, democracy and (de-)coloniality at the crossroad is a discourse informed by the ills of the past, such as white supremacy, white privileges, and white monopoly capital, which defines the privileged position whites continue to have and that they have inherited from centuries of colonialism and apartheid. The collapse of the apartheid government and the launch of the democratic government in 1994 achieved political freedom, but failed to achieve the benefits that would have derived from economic freedom for the previously oppressed majority. What was supposed to be a paradise became a paradise lost. This chapter calls for reversal of colonialism. A narrative analysis was employed to conceptualise and inform discussion on pertinent issues of apartheid, democracy and (de-)coloniality understood to be at the crossroads. The chapter proposes substantive equality and social justice, the de-colonisation of the mind through ubuntu as a pan African philosophical thought, reconciliation, national unity and economic freedom to bring about racial closure to achieve a non-racial society.

In: Paradise Lost

Abstract

Apartheid South Africa presented to racist forces the world over a significant model and resource for ideas, ideology, inspiration and leadership. For such racist forces, it provided a model for social organisation in which the different South African race groups - whites, black Africans, Indians and so-called ‘coloureds’ - would exercise their political rights in separate institutions and geographic spaces, experience social life separately in racially-defined spaces, be educated in separate institutions, engage in certain economic activities in racially-defined areas, etc. It was a model for the establishment of a paradise for one race group in a society with several race groups that, if it gained international acceptance, could possibly have led to its application in similar societies elsewhere. The anti-apartheid struggle, however, envisaged a model in complete contrast with apartheid, one too that promised paradise in a multi-racial society. The introduction explores the concepts of race and racism, as well as introduces some of the key elements of the apartheid ‘paradise’, post-apartheid South Africa and the non-racial ‘paradise’ envisaged by the South African liberation movements. Utilising relevant secondary literature on apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa, the chapter explores key elements of these periods and the envisaged non-racial society. This is followed by brief descriptions of each chapter in the book, with an emphasis on the core objective which draws the chapters in the volume together: dealing with race in order to demonstrate its irrelevance and ultimately bring about its erasure.

In: Paradise Lost

Abstract

This concluding chapter draws together the various key issues dealt with in the chapters in the volume, Paradise Lost: Race and Racism in post-apartheid South Africa, and outlines the key linkages between these chapters: the various strategies the authors of these chapters devise to deal with racial inequality and the racial power structure, racism in the various ways it is manifested, persisting racial identities, and/or how to bring about a non-racial society in South Africa. Included here are the various ways in which the authors illustrate the continuing salience of race and persistence of racism in post-apartheid South Africa, and the irrelevance of race in ways that can contribute to its erasure. The emphasis in the conclusion is the various ways in which post-apartheid South Africa retains some of the privileges of apartheid for a few, as well as some elements of the non-racial paradise for all. It emphasises that it is only by dealing with the former decisively and totally that the latter can be attained, and race and racism ultimately erased. The authors of this chapter conclude that this is only possible if a decoloniality project is embarked upon in earnest.

In: Paradise Lost
Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa
Paradise Lost. Race and Racism in Post-apartheid South Africa is about the continuing salience of race and persistence of racism in post-apartheid South Africa. The chapters in the volume illustrate the multiple ways in which race and racism are manifested and propose various strategies to confront racial inequality, racism and the power structure that underpins it, while exploring, how, through a renewed commitment to a non-racial society, apartheid racial categories can be put under erasure at exactly the time they are being reinforced.