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In: Roads to Paradise: Eschatology and Concepts of the Hereafter in Islam (2 vols.)
In: Roads to Paradise: Eschatology and Concepts of the Hereafter in Islam (2 vols.)
In: Mawlana Rumi Review
In: Mawlana Rumi Review
Texts and Studies in Honor of William C. Chittick and Sachiko Murata
Volume Editor:
Islamic Thought and the Art of Translation honors two of the most beloved and productive scholars in the field of Islamic Studies, Professors William Chittick and Sachiko Murata. For the past five decades, in over 40 books (monographs, editions, translations, edited volumes) and more than 300 articles, Professors Chittick and Murata have presented us with philologically sound and analytically rigorous expositions of the pre-modern Islamic intellectual tradition, particularly in the areas of Sufism and philosophy. They have done so primarily by zeroing in on the technical vocabularies of Arabic, Persian, and Chinese texts in these disciplines, demonstrating just how important careful reading and responsible translation methods are to the study of pre-modern worldviews.

Contributors: Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Masoud Ariankhoo, Mohammed Rustom, Kazuyo Murata, Ali Karjoo-Ravary, Shankar Nair, Maria Massi Dakake, Gregory Vandamme, Alireza Pharaa, Justin Cancelliere, Matthew Melvin-Koushki, Marlene DuBois, Naser Dumairieh, Omar Edaibat, Oludamini Ogunnaike, Khalil Andani, Davlat Dadikhuda, Rosabel Ansari, Muhammad U. Faruque, Sayeh Meisami, Cyrus Ali Zargar, Alireza Asghari, Amer Latif, Mukhtar H. Ali, Laury Silvers, Mohammed Mehdi Ali, Tahera Qutbuddin, Yousef Casewit, and Atif Khalil.
Author:

Abstract

This article investigates the multi-dimensional presence of the important Persian Sufi concept of jawānmardī or chivalry in the writings of the famous 6th/12th century metaphysician, martyr, and mystic ʿAyn al-Quḍāt Hamadānī (d. 525/1131). The article begins by situating jawānmardī vis-à-vis its Arabic Sufi equivalent of futuwwa. Both of them convey a wide range of spiritual perfections ranging from wisdom and detachment to justice and pure generosity. Moreover, the article explores the specifically Persian emphasis on jawānmardī as an embodiment of the ideal type of lover of God. It will consequently be shown how, in the writings of such an influential figure as ʿAyn al-Quḍāt, jawānmardī is most prominently featured in three distinctive modes: an aspirational ideal, a realised concept, and the key to unlock the mystery of one of the greatest chevaliers, namely Iblīs.

Open Access
In: Journal of Islamic Ethics
Author:

Abstract

Modern scholars have been interested in the great Persian Sufi martyr ʿAyn al-Quḍāt Hamadānī (d. 525/1131) for over six decades. Despite this fact, many aspects of his life and thought still remain terra incognita. Our knowledge of the circumstances surrounding his death is a case-in-point. Although we have a fairly good understanding of the factors which led to ʿAyn al-Quḍāt’s demise, there are other “causes” which simultaneously complement and problematize this understanding. Chief amongst these are the underlying reasons for ʿAyn al-Quḍāt’s critique of the Seljuk government, as well as something which ʿAyn al-Quḍāt saw as a more subtle cause for his death several years before his anticipated state execution.

In: Journal of Sufi Studies