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Author: Monika Barget

Abstract

This chapter focuses on early portraits of American revolutionary leaders that circulated in Europe. The portraits are discussed in the wider context of eighteenth-century visualizations of power and compared with aristocratic portraiture of the time. While depictions of monarchs and princes often reflected Enlightenment ideals, portraits of revolutionaries also drew on existing elite iconography. The chapter argues that, in the course of a transcontinental media exchange, visual concepts of leadership approximated each other and were shared beyond political frontlines. The rise of national identities and active citizenship, for instance, shaped the political iconography of monarchical and republican government systems alike.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery

Abstract

In the seventeenth century, Hungarian resistance to Habsburg rule fostered considerable media output in the Holy Roman Empire as well as in other regions of Europe. Newspapers, stand-alone pamphlets, and extensive historiographical treatises in multiple languages covered the rise and fall of Hungarian leader Ferenc III Nádasdy and the rebellion of Protestant nobleman Imre Thököly. The chapter analyzes this rich iconography in the context of complex seventeenth-century European alliance systems and aims to shed light on the interplay of government-driven communication and a growing independent news sector.

In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery
In: Revolts and Political Violence in Early Modern Imagery
In the early modern period, images of revolts and violence became increasingly important tools to legitimize or contest political structures. This volume offers the first in-depth analysis of how early modern people produced and consumed violent imagery, and assesses its role in memory practices, political mobilization, and the negotiation of cruelty and justice.

Critically evaluating the traditional focus on Western European imagery, the case studies in this book draw on evidence from Russia, China, Hungary, Portugal, Germany, North America, and other regions. The contributors highlight the distinctions among visual cultures of violence, as well as their entanglements in networks of intensive transregional communication, early globalization, and European colonization.

Contributors: Monika Barget, David de Boer, Nóra G. Etényi, Fabian Fechner, Joana Fraga, Malte Griesse, Alain Hugon, Gleb Kazakov, Nancy Kollmann, Ya-Chen Ma, Galina Tirnanić, and Ramon Voges.