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Recently, security studies have grasped the attention of human rights practitioners, development thinkers as well as scholars for their value in creating a congenial atmosphere where everyone can enjoy equal social and economic rights. The Adivasis (indigenous communities) in Bangladesh are ignored when it comes to addressing their distinct identity and marginalised status, which obstructs their access to rights. This paper will attempt to capture the tacit and explicit insecurities of the Garo Adivasi (indigenous community) in order to understand the prevailing situation. A qualitative method was used to understand the community both empirically and empathetically. The community has experienced evictions, physical assaults and violence at the hands of various agencies including the forest department, political parties and local influential persons. The females of this community are also the victims of various forms of injustices, such as physical assaults, rape, dowry deaths and so on.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights

Human security is a fundamental approach, which focuses on ensuring security for the individual in respect of socio-economic status, creed and ethnic background. Religious difference serves as a source of potential conflict in every heterogeneous society that violates human security and human rights. The study examined how religious identity jeopardised human security and human rights in relation to the Ahmadiyya community in Bangladesh. A qualitative method was applied to collect data using in-depth interviews, case studies, informal group discussions and participant observations. The study revealed that Ahmadiyya could hardly escape from vicious attacks and harassments because of their religious identity. The study also found that the prevailing state of insecurity violated the human rights of the community with regard to different social aspects. Under harsh circumstances, many Ahmadiyya left their residences to save their lives from aggressive persecutions from anti-Ahmadiyya sections. Thus, the violent experiences of the Ahmadiyya discouraged them from contributing to socio-economic growth of the nation.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights