Search Results

Series:

Anonymous

Edited by Nādara Jalalī

The Saljuqs were a Turco-Muslim dynasty which ruled over Persia and parts of Central Asia and the Middle East from the 11th through the 13th century. After the death of Malikshāh I in 485/1092, the Great Saljuq empire was dissolved among his quarreling descendants, leading to the emergence of a whole series of smaller Saljuq states in Central Asia, Persia, Asia Minor, Syria, and Iraq. In Asia Minor, the Saljuqs of Rūm established themselves definitely with the coming to power of Qilič Arslan I in Konya in 485/1092. The Rūm Saljuqs continued their reign with different degrees of success, unison, and independence from other powers until the beginning of the 14th century. The present present work, a Persian history of the Saljuqs with an emphasis on the Saljuqs of Rūm, was written in Konya, around 756/1355. Rich in information, it is only second to the Mukhtaṣar of Ibn Bībī’s (d. after 1285) Saljūq-nāma.

Musakhkhir al-bilād

Tārīkh-i Shībāniyān

Series:

Muḥammad Yār b. ʿArab Qaṭaghān

Edited by Nādara Jalalī

ʿAbdallāh Khān b. Iskandar (d. 1006/1598) of the Uzbek Abu ʼl-Khayrid (Shībānid) dynasty was the ruler of the Khanate of Bukhara between 991/1583 and 1006/1598. Before then, he had already defended the territorial interests of his family against other branches of the Abu ʼl-Khayrids, putting his half-witted father on the throne in Bukhara in 961/1554 while he himself became the de facto ruler of the khanate, aged 23. During the time of ʿAbdallāh, Transoxania lived through a whole series of internal and external conflicts against a backdrop of ever changing alliances. In this period, ʿAbdallāh’s centralizing policy led to considerable improvements in infrastructure, favouring the development of trade. The present work by Muḥammad Yār b. ʿArab Qaṭaghān is a history of the Abu ʼl-Khayrid dynasty with an emphasis on the reign of ʿAbdallāh Khān. Apart from its obvious historical interest, it contains a lot of linguistic and geographical information, besides highlighting the significance of Persianate culture in that region.