In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)
In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)
In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)
In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)
In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)
In: The Orion Center Bibliography of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Associated Literature (2000-2006)

Abstract

Today’s students need to be both globally and digitally literate as they use technology to work and interact with culturally and geographically diverse people. In addition, students need to understand critical literacy in order to counter hegemony in the world and interact with others in socially responsible ways. The mission of the chapter will be (a) to explain the logistics of how a rural junior high team learned critical, digital and global citizenship while conducting project-based learning on global hunger and (b) to explain the successes and challenges teachers perceived when conducting the project-based learning on a global social justice topic in their rural context. The framework for this chapter builds upon cosmopolitan theory, global teaching model, and project-based inquiry model to form the Glocal Teaching Model. Glocal combines the words local and global to signify that social justice education includes both local and global issues. The Global Teaching Model is made up of four dimensions: situated practice, integrated global learning, critical literacy instruction, and intercultural experiences. This model describes an array of teaching practices that promote critical global citizenship.

In: Educating for Social Justice

Abstract

We compared face recognition of humans and fandom-themed characters (art and costumes) between a sample of furries (fans of anthropomorphic animal art) and non-furries. Participants viewed images that included humans, drawn anthropomorphic animals, and anthropomorphic animal costumes, and were later tested on their ability to recognize faces from a subset of the viewed images. While furries and non-furries did not differ in their recollection of human faces, furries showed significantly better memory for faces in furry-themed artwork and costumes. The results are discussed in relation to own-group bias in face recognition.

In: Journal of Cognition and Culture