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Edited by Robin Lefere and Nadia Lie

This book brings together scholars from Europe, Latin America and the United States in a shared effort to assess the critical potential of the transnational paradigm for Spanish and Latin American cinema. After an introductory part, including a state of the art discussion of some 50 publications, the book presents a set of strategically chosen case-studies, grouped into three categories: transnational modes of production, transnational directors, and transnational modes of narration. Written by some of the leading scholars in Hispanic film studies, the book includes contributions on individual directors and producers (e.g. Almodóvar, Buñuel and González Iñárritu), as well as on genres (road movie), interstitial subjectivities (children, queer and diasporic personalities) and festivals (e.g. BAFICI).

Este libro, que es el fruto de la colaboración de académicos de Europa, América Latina y Estados Unidos, debate y detalla la fecundidad crítica del paradigma transnacional en los cines español y latinoamericano. Después de una parte teórica que ofrece un estado de la cuestión basado en más de 50 publicaciones, analiza casos emblemáticos por diversas razones, distribuidos en tres categorías: modos de producción transnacionales, directores transnacionales, narraciones transnacionales. Escritos por destacados especialistas del cine hispánico, los estudios se centran en importantes directores y productores (Almodóvar, Buñuel, González Iñárritu, etc.), en géneros (como la road movie), en subjetividades específicas (niños, personalidades queer o marcadas por el exilio) y en festivales (entre otros, el BAFICI).
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Robin Lefere and Nadia Lie

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Robin Lefere and Nadia Lie

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Robin Lefere and Nadia Lie

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Constellation Caliban

Figurations of a Character

Edited by Nadia Lie and Theo D'haen

We are now in the Age of Caliban rather than in the Time of Ariel or the Era of Prospero, Harold Bloom claimed in 1992. Bloom was specifically referring to Caliban's rising popularity as the prototype of the colonised or repressed subject, especially since the 1980s. However, already earlier the figure of Caliban had inspired artists from the most divergent backgrounds: Robert Browning, Ernest Renan, Aimé Césaire, and Peter Greenaway, to name only some of the better known.
Much has already been published on Caliban, and there exist a number of excellent surveys of this character's appearance in literature and the other arts. The present collection does not aim to trace Caliban over the ages. Rather, Constellation Caliban intends to look at a number of specific refigurations of Caliban. What is the Caliban-figure's role and function within a specific work of art? What is its relation to the other signifiers in that work of art? What interests are invested in the Caliban-figure, what values does it represent or advocate? Whose interests and values are these?
These and similar questions guided the contributors to the present volume. In other words, what one finds here is not a study of origins, not a genealogy, not a reception-study, but rather a fascinating series of case studies informed by current theoretical debate in areas such as women's studies, sociology of literature and of the intellectuals, nation-formation, new historicism, etc.
Its interdisciplinary approach and its attention to matters of multi-culturalism make Constellation Caliban into an unusually wide ranging and highly original contribution to Shakespeare-studies. The book should appeal to students of English Literature, Modern European Literature, Comparative Literature, Drama or Theatre Studies, and Cultural Studies, as well as to anyone interested in looking at literature within a broad social and historical context while still appreciating detailed textual analyses.
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Edited by Lieven D'Hulst, Jean-Marc Moura, Liesbeth De Bleeker and Nadia Lie

Contemporary research on Caribbean literature displays a rich variety of themes, literary and cultural categories, forms, genres, languages. Still, the concept of a unified Caribbean literary space remains questionable, depending upon whether one strictly limits it to the islands, enlarges it to adopt a Latin-American perspective, or even grants it inter-American dimensions. This book is an ambitious tentative to bring together specialists from various disciplines: neither just French, Spanish, English, or Comparative studies specialists, nor strictly “Caribbean literature” specialists, but also theoreticians, cultural studies scholars, historians of cultural translation and of intercultural transfers. The contributions tackle two major questions: what is the best possible division of labor between comparative literature, cultural anthropology and models of national or regional literary histories? how should one make use of “transversal” concepts such as: memory, space, linguistic awareness, intercultural translation, orature or hybridization? Case studies and concrete projects for integrated research alternate with theoretical and historiographical contributions. This volume is of utmost interest to students of Caribbean studies in general, but also to anyone interested in Caribbean literatures in Spanish, English and French, as well as to students in comparative literature, cultural studies and transfer research.