Author: Nadia Vidro
Notwithstanding its early origins and its importance for the history of Hebrew linguistics, the Karaite grammatical tradition has received insufficient scholarly attention, mainly due to the scarcity of reconstructed primary sources emanating from this school of Hebrew grammar. This book reconstructs from unpublished manuscripts a medieval Karaite treatise on the grammar of Biblical Hebrew in Judaeo-Arabic Kitāb al-ʿUqūd fī Taṣārīf al-Luġa al-ʿIbrāniyya and studies verbal morphological theories expressed in this and related Karaite works. Furthermore, the book examines Karaite approaches to the verbal classification as well as didactic tools used in Karaite pedagogical grammars.
A Critical Edition and English translation of Kitāb al-ʿUqūd fī Taṣārīf al-Luġa al-ʿIbrāniyya. Cambridge Genizah Studies Series Volume 6.
Author: Nadia Vidro
In this book Nadia Vidro presents a critical edition and English translation of the first Karaite pedagogical grammar of Hebrew, Kitāb al-ʿUqūd fī Taṣārīf al-Luġa al-ʿIbrāniyya. Composed in Jerusalem in the 11th century, Kitāb al-ʿUqūd is a concise description of Hebrew prepared specifically to cater for the needs of students just beginning their study of the language. The critical edition is accompanied by an historical introduction, a description of manuscripts, and a glossary of grammatical terminology. This publication expands the corpus of available primary sources emanating from the Karaite school of Hebrew grammar, and makes this fascinating and important medieval work accessible to a wide audience of Hebrew linguists, Biblical scholars and those interested in language pedagogy and its history.
Author: Nadia Vidro

Abstract

This article is a case study in the transition of texts from manuscript to print. It looks at all surviving manuscripts and 15th–16th-centuries printed editions of Jacob ben Asher’s ʾArbaʿah Turim, Tur Orah Hayyim. Based on a close textual investigation of Tur Orah Hayyim, chapter 428, it identifies and dates manuscript clusters, and establishes how different imprints are linked with the manuscript tradition and with each other. The article suggests that the Soncino 1490 imprint by Solomon Soncino exerted a crucial influence on the printed text of Tur Orah Hayyim. Whereas before imprints were independent and closely associated with individual manuscripts, Soncino 1490 became the archetype for all but one subsequent 15th–16th-centuries imprints, and direct dependence on manuscripts subsided.

In: Zutot
In: A Medieval Karaite Pedagogical Grammar of Hebrew
In: A Medieval Karaite Pedagogical Grammar of Hebrew
In: A Medieval Karaite Pedagogical Grammar of Hebrew
In: A Medieval Karaite Pedagogical Grammar of Hebrew
In: A Medieval Karaite Pedagogical Grammar of Hebrew