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In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
In: Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism
Ḥasan b. ʿAlī al-ʿUjaymī’s (d. 1113/1702) Khabāyā al-zawāyā “Secrets of the Lodges” & Risāla fī ṭuruq al-ṣūfiyya “Treatise on Sufi Orders”
Author:
The distinguished position of the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz attracted Sufis from across the Islamic world, making it the largest Sufi center of that era, with more than forty Sufi orders active during the Ottoman period. Most of the region’s many scholars were associated with Sufism and affiliated to these orders; their lives and Sufi activities more broadly were documented by one of their number, al-ʿUjaymī, in two texts. These texts, critically edited here for the first time, constitute some of the best evidence for the character of spiritual life in the Ḥijāz during the seventeenth and early eighteenth century.
Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī’s (d. 1101/1690) Theology of Sufism
Author:
In Intellectual Life in the Ḥijāz before Wahhabism, Naser Dumairieh argues that, as a result of changing global conditions facilitating the movement of scholars and texts, the seventeenth-century Ḥijāz was one of the most important intellectual centers of the Islamic world, acting as a hub between its different parts.
Positioning Ibrāhīm al-Kūrānī (d. 1101/1690) as representative of the intellectual activities of the pre-Wahhabism Ḥijāz, Dumairieh argues that his coherent philosophical system represents a synthesis of several major post-classical traditions of Islamic thought, namely kalām and Akbarian appropriations of Avicennian metaphysics. Al-Kūrānī’s work is the culmination of the philosophized Akbarian tradition; with his reconciliation of Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas with Ashʿarī theology, Ibn ʿArabī’s ideas became Islamic theology.