Author: Natan Lerner
Author: Natan Lerner
Author: Natan Lerner
Author: Natan Lerner
The universal feeling that discrimination and intolerance based on race. religion or beliefs have to be confronted by the international community led to the adoption, half a century ago, of the international convention to which this book is devoted, one of the most ratified treaties. The book comments on the contents of the Convention and its impact on anti-racist and anti-bias legislation and jurisprudence, as well as its influence on, and applicability to other international texts. In an Introduction to this reprint, the author updates the status of the Convention, summarizes the work of CERD, the implementation body of the Convention, and discusses its relevance to general human rights, particularly the area of religious intolerance, and some difficult issues such as the possible clash with other fundamental freedoms.
Author: Natan Lerner
Religion, and beliefs related to religion, are a central factor in international life and politics. International law, and human rights law in particular, have to take into consideration the religious dimension, and have done it to some extent. A body of positive law has already been developed for the protection of freedom of religion, and from religion, by the United Nations and regional and specialized organizations.

The first edition of this book appeared six years ago, in coincidence with the 25th anniversary of the 1981 United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion of Belief. It discussed the legal meaning of religion and belief, the United Nations work in this respect, religious minorities, relevant regional and special arrangements, the issue of proselytism, religion and terrorism, religious symbols, international criminal law, and some particular cases such as the state and religious communities in Israel, and this country’s agreement with the Holy See.

This second edition of the book updates the information on relevant developments that took place in the time elapsed. and incorporates several new chapters on important issues related to religious freedoms. Such are the chapters on freedom from religion, religion and freedom of association, religion and freedom of expression (including the controversy with respect of defamation of religions), and group rights and legal pluralism. The order of the chapters has been rearranged.

It is hoped that law and political science schools, human rights associations and scholars, as well as governments and bodies active in the area of religious freedoms, will find interest in this second, revised and considerably enlarged, edition.
Author: Natan Lerner

Abstract

The two reviewed books belong to a series of “Studies in Religion, Secular Beliefs and Human Rights” published by Martinus Nijhoff. Both constitute a significant contribution to the literature on religion and human rights that developed in the last decade, after many years of neglect of the subject. Both are collective books and the outcome of international conferences. They deal with diverse aspects of the interaction between religion and human rights and international law. A recurrent question is to what extent has religion influenced human rights or if these are a post World War II and post-Holocaust phenomenon, strictly secular. Does God Believe in Human Rights? contains an introduction and 14 essays. The volume Religion, Human Rights and International Law is subtitled A Critical Examination of Islamic State Practices, a subject to which a considerable part of the volume is devoted. It contains 18 individual contributions, in addition to introductory reflections by the editors.

In: International Journal on Minority and Group Rights
Author: Natan Lerner

Abstract

Freedom of expression is a fundamental right, but not an absolute one, and is subject to limitations determined by law. Article 19 of the ICCPR permits certain restrictions and should be read in conjunction with Article 20, prohibiting advocacy of hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence. There should not be differences in the treatment of incitement to national, racial or religious hatred. Limitations on freedom of expression regarding other liberties permit to draw analogies. Article 4 of the Convention on Racial Discrimination and Article III of the Genocide Convention are relevant, and the discussion on the existence of an international public order has to be considered. The Genocide Convention refers equally to incitement against racial or religious groups. Frequently, ethnicity and religion overlap.

In: Religion & Human Rights
In: The Progression of International Law