Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 70 items for

  • Author or Editor: Nicholas Sims-Williams x
  • 限定层级: All x
Clear All

an eastern province of the Sasanian empire. The clearest evidence for the existence of such a province is provided by a bulla bearing the impression of a seal.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

an archeological site in Ḡazni province, Afghanistan, situated about 20 km north of Ḡazni on the route between Ḡazni and Wardak.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

(i.e., “Father” Isaiah), late 4th century A.D., author of Christian ascetical texts; from these it appears that he was a hermit who lived in the desert of Scete in Egypt, of whom several anecdotes are told in the Apophthegmata patrum.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

term used to refer to a group of Iranian languages most of which are or were spoken in lands to the east of the present state of Persia.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

Christian martyrological text, of which versions survive in many languages, including Greek, Latin, Syriac, and Armenian.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

(346-399 C.E.), prolific author of Christian literature in Greek. After passing the first part of his career as a preacher in Constantinople, Evagrius took up abode in the Egyptian desert and became one of the most renowned of its many ascetics.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

or Yoḥannān Daylomāyā (d. 738), Eastern Syrian saint and founder of monasteries in Fārs.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

(late 7th century), Nestorian author of ascetic literature in Syriac. Preꏂsumably a native of Qaṭar, as his surname suggests, he lived for a time at the monastery of Rabban Šābūr, near Šostar in Ḵūzestān. His writings included commentaries on the Paradise of the Fathers and on the 26 “discourses” of Abbā Isaiah; fragments of the latter are found in Sogdian translation.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

Christian legend attested by texts in many languages.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online

or MĀRAWGEN; legendary Christian saint traditionally credited with the introduction of Egyptian monasticism into Mesopotamia and Persia.

in Encyclopaedia Iranica Online