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Author: Nicola Simmons

Abstract

This synthesis chapter outlines the common themes of the collaborative writing groups in the book. Prevalent themes include writing retreat pragmatics such as how positive processes are supported by setting and negotiating goals and having a dedicated space. They also include the soul work that comprises trusting and successful writing partnerships that help avoid isolation and support the development of scholarly identity as an academic writer.

In: Critical Collaborative Communities
In: Critical Issues in Higher Education
Editors: Nicola Simmons and Ann Singh
Writing comprises a significant proportion of academic staff members’ roles. While academics have been acculturated to the notion of ‘publish or perish,’ they often struggle to find the time to accomplish writing papers and tend to work alone. The result can be a sense of significant stress and isolation around the writing process. Writing partnerships, groups, and retreats help mitigate these challenges and provide significant positive writing experiences for their members.

Critical Collaborative Communities describes diverse examples of partnerships from writing regularly with one or two colleagues to larger groups that meet for a single day, regular writing meetings, or a retreat over several days. While these approaches bring mutual support for members, each is not without its respective challenges. Each chapter outlines an approach to writing partnerships and interrogates its strengths and limitations as well as proposes recommendations for others hoping to implement the practice. Authors in this volume describe how they have built significant trusting relationships that have helped avoid isolation and have led to their self-authorship as academic writers.
In: Critical Collaborative Communities
In: Critical Collaborative Communities
In: Critical Collaborative Communities
In: Critical Collaborative Communities

Abstract

Recognizing the challenges that often attach to writing for publication, this chapter describes a Collaborative Writing Groups (CWG) initiative that supports scholarly writing about teaching and learning in higher education. This model, which sees groups of scholars from multiple institutions working together virtually and face-to-face to co-author manuscripts on topics of shared interest, has been shown to contribute to building scholarly capacity, community, and collaboration, while also leading to the development of manuscripts that contribute meaningfully to the literature. We describe the model, which was initially developed by the International Network for Learning and Teaching Geography in Higher Education and subsequently modified for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, outline some of the evidence demonstrating its efficacy, and reflect on our experiences adapting the initiative to support collaborative writing in the Canadian context. While the CWG process was originally developed for individuals working on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), it is also applicable to those in other fields and disciplines. Thus, we situate our discussion within the SoTL literature that shaped the initiative, but also offer considerations and recommendations for those wishing to adapt and apply the model in other contexts.

In: Critical Collaborative Communities
This series represents a forum for important issues that do and will affect how learning and teaching are thought about and practised. All educational venues and situations are undergoing change because of information and communications technology, globalization and paradigmatic shifts in determining what knowledge is valued. Our scope includes matters in primary, secondary and tertiary education as well as community-based informal circumstances. Important and significant differences between information and knowledge represent a departure from traditional educational offerings heightening the need for further and deeper understanding of the implications such opportunities have for influencing what happens in schools, colleges and universities around the globe. An inclusive approach helps attend to important current and future issues related to learners, teachers and the variety of cultures and venues in which educational efforts occur. We invite forward-looking contributions that reflect an international comparative perspective illustrating similarities and differences in situations, problems, solutions and outcomes.

In keeping with Michael’s spirit, the friends and family of Dr. Michael Kompf have established the Dr. Michael Kompf Graduate Student Travel Scholarship , which will be administered and housed in the Faculty of Education of Brock University. Tax deductible contributions to the endowment fund for the award can be made by cheque to Brock University with the subject note: Dr. Michael Kompf Graduate Student Travel Scholarship, or contributions can be made online by going to: www.brocku.ca/onlinedonations/ and clicking on the drop down box for the Dr. Michael Kompf Graduate Student Travel Scholarship.

Abstract

In this chapter, we describe our international collaborative writing group (ICWG), which came together in 2012 and reconvened in 2017 to share experiences, renew friendships, and reflect on past memories and expectations. This group formed a micro-community of practice that has celebrated successes while simultaneously being cognisant of differences in views, direction, and output. While we initially only ‘signed up’ for a writing collaborative project five years ago, we discuss what keeps us coming together – in small groups as well as the whole – for further writing projects. Using Personal Construct Theory (PCT), we discuss how we have built a learning culture for our group. We reflect on what aspects of the collaboration, including ways the initial writing group was structured and supported, have invited us to continue to come back to the wellspring of collaborative work. We bring international perspectives on what being part of a writing group means beyond the simple output of scholarly work to interrogate what has allowed us both to be a community of practice, and to practice as a community.

In: Critical Collaborative Communities