Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Nik Theodore x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author:

This article explores strategies for organizing workers in residential construction in light of the decades long restructuring of the industry. It begins by charting the course of this restructuring and the impacts it has had on employment conditions, including changes in union density, the deterioration of labor standards, and the rise of various labor market intermediaries that assist employers in managing contingent labor. The article then turns to day labor and the controversial topic of whether worker centers should operate hiring halls. It argues that, unlike temporary staffing agencies and other labor brokers, the operation of day labor worker centers is complementary to union organizing strategies. These hiring halls help monitor employer practices while also raising the floor on wages and working conditions. It concludes with a call for ongoing innovation in worker organizing.

In: WorkingUSA
Authors: and

This article examines the impact of the recent NLRB M.B. Sturgis and Jeffboat Division ruling on organizing opportunities for low-wage temporary workers. While the ruling improves opportunities for “permatemps,” it may not benefit workers with the most tenuous employment relationships.

In: WorkingUSA
Authors: and

Increasingly, employers reduce costs through outsourcing work to temporary staffing agencies, displacing the price of unemployment to temporary staffing agencies and their workers. Outsourcing work, Mehta and Theodore observe, reduces the cost for on-site employers while greatly increasing labor market turbulence even in times of economic growth, as temporary staffing agencies lay off workers to reduce their own unemployment insurance costs.

In: WorkingUSA
Authors: and

This article examines workplace safety conditions in Atlanta’s construction industry in light of the growing presence of temporary staffing agencies in the industry. Using data collected from surveys of building contractors, temporary staffing agencies, and temp workers, the article explores the ways in which the use of agency-supplied temps by construction contractors subverts workplace health and safety regulations, thereby exposing construction workers to heightened risk of injury.

In: WorkingUSA

This article assesses the employment situation in the U.S. information technology (IT) industry, examining recent job growth trends and the underlying factors, such as flexible staffing arrangements and offshore outsourcing, which are responsible for falling IT employment. The IT industry, which was at the center of the 1990s boom, was caught in the midst of the 2001 recession and the ensuing jobless recovery. Employment has fallen dramatically between March 2001 and March 2004 and the IT industry lost approximately 403,000 jobs, more than half of which were eliminated during the economic recovery. While cyclical factors are partially responsible for these employment declines, underlying weaknesses in IT labor markets remain as U.S. corporations continue to pursue restructuring tactics aimed at achieving immediate reductions in labor costs.

In: WorkingUSA

This article presents the findings of a survey of day laborers who gather at informal hiring sites in the New York metropolitan area. Day laborers are employed by construction contractors, landscaping companies, homeowners, and small businesses to undertake manual labor jobs for low pay. The work is precarious and steady employment is rare. In addition, the day labor market is characterized by routine violations of labor and employment laws, and workers are often exposed to unsafe working conditions. These conditions prevail, in part, because day laborers largely are disconnected from workers rights’ advocacy efforts. However, the creation of worker centers aims to remedy this situation. Several community organizations in the region are now actively contesting abuses in the day labor market and increasing both accountability in and transparency of the hiring process.

In: WorkingUSA

Abstract

For nearly a half century, questions of why and how firms navigate the “make-buy” decision have animated fields as varied as industrial relations and economic geography. The idea of “core competencies” became the dominant explanation of corporate decision-making processes, where any activity deemed outside of the central specializations of the firm is a possible candidate for outsourcing. Coupled with the focus on short-term profit taking, corporate leaders have grown increasingly focused on shedding less-profitable activities and shifting supply-chain risk—leading to high levels of lead-firm influence over subcontracting markets and the cost-based competition that permeates them. This paper examines the role of third-party logistics companies (3pl s) in the warehousing sector. It argues that efforts to contain operational costs increasingly are focused on labor and that the ability to access and deploy low-cost labor is among the “core competencies” touted by many 3pl s in the warehousing sector.

In: Journal of Labor and Society