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Author: Noel M. Morada

Abstract

asean has not collectively responded to the Rakhine crisis since 2017 from the perspective of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle and has failed to put a stop to the atrocities against the Rohingyas in Myanmar. This article argues that there is less support in the region for invoking the non-interference principle in dealing with Myanmar on the Rohingya issue even as some members have called for its relaxation and use of constructive engagement instead. As international pressure in pursuit of justice and accountability increased, so did calls from within the region for asean to do more beyond just providing humanitarian assistance to affected communities in Rakhine. Even so, asean consciously avoids pressing too hard on the issue of accountability as this could force the government and the military in Myanmar to totally disengage with asean and the international community on the Rakhine crisis, as well as push Nay Pyi Daw further into China’s embrace and thus undermine asean’s strategic interests in the region.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Noel M. Morada

This article provides an overview of how the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean) has responded to human protection issues such as human rights, mass atrocities prevention, and civilian protection in armed conflicts. It examines the evolution and dynamics of asean’s regionalism and the factors that shaped and transformed its norms. While asean has adopted the language of human security and human protection, traditional norms of sovereignty and non-interference remain sticky. The pluralist nature of asean also limits the organization from responding effectively to crisis situations within member states such as identity-based conflicts. However, there are also opportunities for continuing engagement on human protection issues with various stakeholders at the regional and domestic levels. Some asean member states are more open to mainstreaming the principle of Responsibility to Protect in the agenda of asean and recognize the importance of building the capacity of member states in preventing mass atrocities.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Noel M. Morada

Two years since the arsa attacks and the military’s clearing operations in Rakhine, violence and continuing atrocities are being committed by the Tatmadaw (Myanmar Army) against the Rohingya and Arakanese civilians in Myanmar. This article examines the developments since August 2017 and the continuing failure of the international community to adequately respond to human rights violations and humanitarian needs of conflict-affected communities inside and outside of Myanmar. The article argues that despite the strong international outrage against the Tatmadaw’s atrocities, the international community’s failure to act springs from three main factors. First, the United Nations remains divided in response to the crisis as a result of ongoing systemic and structural deficiencies. Second, there is a lack of political will on the part of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean) to collectively impose sanctions against an erring member. Finally, the ongoing full autonomy of the Tatmadaw to operate above the law and remain unaccountable for continuing atrocities in the country. Their autonomy is facilitated by a precarious democratic transition led by Aung San Suu Kyi who appears more concerned about domestic repercussions of giving in to international pressure than about her tarnished reputation as a human rights defender. This article details the ongoing humanitarian needs of affected communities within and outside the country.

In: Global Responsibility to Protect
Author: Morada Noel M.

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of how the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (asean) has responded to human protection issues such as human rights, mass atrocities prevention, and civilian protection in armed conflicts. It examines the evolution and dynamics of asean’s regionalism and the factors that shaped and transformed its norms. While asean has adopted the language of human security and human protection, traditional norms of sovereignty and non-interference remain sticky. The pluralist nature of asean also limits the organization from responding effectively to crisis situations within member states such as identity-based conflicts. However, there are also opportunities for continuing engagement on human protection issues with various stakeholders at the regional and domestic levels. Some asean member states are more open to mainstreaming the principle of Responsibility to Protect in the agenda of asean and recognize the importance of building the capacity of member states in preventing mass atrocities.

In: Regionalism and Human Protection
Author: Noel M. Morada

Abstract

Since the adoption of the asean Charter in 2008, the friction between the group’s traditional norms of sovereignty and non-interference and its people-oriented principles upholding universal norms such as human rights has become more pronounced in the case of Myanmar. This chapter examines asean’s diplomacy in dealing with Myanmar’s human rights protection issues. It argues that although in practice asean has put aside its non-interference principle in response to human protection problems within Myanmar including the crisis in Rakhine, the organisation’s collective efforts have been rebuffed by the previous military junta and the current civilian government which also invoked the same principle in protecting its sovereignty. While there are increasing calls from some asean members and other non-state actors in the region to consider relaxing the non-interference principle when it comes to humanitarian crisis issues affecting the region, it appears that reaching a consensus on this within the group would be extremely difficult given the strong resistance of some members to the idea.

In: Regionalism and Human Protection
In: Philippine Political Science Journal
In: Regionalism and Human Protection
In: Regionalism and Human Protection
Reflections from Southeast Asia and Africa
This book provides a detailed examination of how norms concerning human rights, civilian protection and prevention of mass atrocities have fared in the regions of Southeast Asia and Africa. Originated as a spin off of the journal GR2P (vol. 8/2-3, 2016), it has been enriched with new chapters and revised contents, which contrast the different experiences of those regions and investigates the expression of human protection norms in regional organisations and thematic policy agendas as well as the role of civil society mechanisms/processes. Hunt and Morada have brought together scholar-practitioners from across the world.The collection identifies a range of insights that provide rich opportunities for south-south exchange and mutual learning when it comes to promoting and building capacity for human protection at the regional level.