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Die Untersuchung verfolgt die Entwicklung der Subgattung Sozialroman in den drei behandelten Literaturen, wobei der Akzent auf der Rezeption der englischen und französischen Romane in Deutschland liegt. Der Verfasser versteht Rezeption im umfassenden Sinn und berücksichtigt nicht nur die literarische Kritik und die produktive Aufnahme der ausländischen Vorgänger durch die deutschen Autoren des 19. Jahrhunderts, sondern auch die Verbreitung der Werke durch den Buchhandel, die Leihbibliotheken und das Zeitungsfeuilleton, ihre Erwähnungen in autobiographischen Texten und Briefen, ihre Übersetzungen, die Zensur und die Einwirkung der Sozialromane auf die Mentalität und das Verhalten der Leser. Dadurch entsteht ein detail- und farbenreiches Bild der Beziehungen des deutschen Publikums, der Kritik und der Autoren zur englischen und französischen Literatur, das die herkömmlichen Vorstellungen von einer kulturellen Sonderentwicklung in Deutschland infolge ökonomischer und politischer 'Verspätung' infrage stellt.
In: A Breath of Fresh Eyre

Abstract

Fiction by the high proportion of female British writers was widely read, translated, reviewed and at times rewritten in nineteenth-century Germany. While the gothic, historical and social novels of the eighteen-twenties and -thirties were met with considerable rejection, the domestic fiction of Maria Edgeworth and Jane Austen was considered to be respectable. Attempts by women writers of the eighteen-forties and -fifties to depict society and educational values, or to reconcile class differences, which could for example be found in the realistic writings of Elizabeth Gaskell and George Eliot, were reviewed positively. The sensational novels of the eighteen-sixties, however, incurred severe criticism. After an examination of these general tendencies and developments, the German reception of Charlotte Bronte’s novels Jane Eyre and Shirley will be analysed in some depth, and an evaluation of German reworkings of Jane Eyre by Ch. Birch-Pfeiffer, E. Marlitt, and A. Bolte will conclude my observations.

In: The Novel in Anglo-German Context
In: Anglo-German Theatrical Exchange
In: Anglo-German Theatrical Exchange

Abstract

Most of Voltaire’s prose and verse epics were considered dangerous to the maintenance of the Old Regime and Catholic orthodoxy in Austria. The French philosophe was, therefore, top on the Austrian lists of banned books. Works such as the Dictionnaire philosophique portatif, Candide, and the Pucelle d’Orléans were considered totally unacceptable. On the other hand, Voltaire’s plays were highly welcome in Vienna. Virtually all of them were reprinted and staged, some of them also translated. Only in the decade of political and cultural thaw under Emperor Joseph ii, were publishers and journalists able to introduce the public to some of the philosopher’s most biting criticism, with Austrian writers imitating his style. But around 1790 the time of intellectual thaw was over. Voltaire had done his duty of enlightening the Austrians and was again to disappear from the Viennese cultural scene.

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

Abstract

Most of Voltaire’s prose and verse epics were considered dangerous to the maintenance of the Old Regime and Catholic orthodoxy in Austria. The French philosophe was, therefore, top on the Austrian lists of banned books. Works such as the Dictionnaire philosophique portatif, Candide, and the Pucelle d’Orléans were considered totally unacceptable. On the other hand, Voltaire’s plays were highly welcome in Vienna. Virtually all of them were reprinted and staged, some of them also translated. Only in the decade of political and cultural thaw under Emperor Joseph ii, were publishers and journalists able to introduce the public to some of the philosopher’s most biting criticism, with Austrian writers imitating his style. But around 1790 the time of intellectual thaw was over. Voltaire had done his duty of enlightening the Austrians and was again to disappear from the Viennese cultural scene.

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
The influence of censorship on the intellectual and political life in the Habsburg Monarchy during the period under scrutiny can hardly be overstated. This study examines the institutional foundations, operating principles, and results of the censorial activity through analysis of the prohibition lists and examination of the censors themselves. The effects of censorship on the authors, publishers, and booksellers of the time are illustrated with the help of contemporary documents. Numerous case studies focus on individual works forbidden by the censors: Romanticists like Ludwig Tieck and E. T. A. Hoffmann and even authors of classic German literature like Wieland, Goethe, and Schiller saw their works slashed, as did writers of popular French and English novels and plays. An annex documents the most important regulations along with a selection of censorial reports.     

Abstract

Kind aus Blau (Child of Blue) is a hybrid of a jazz biography and a work of experimental prose that deviates both from the patterns of a commercial jazz biography and from conventional narrative prose. Pohl defamiliarizes the ‘jazz code’, i.e. the experience of slavery and racist persecution, and impregnates his text with music. By way of intermedial transfer from music, experimental techniques that are typical of poetry rather than prose are imported into the text. Playing with the graphics and sounds of words, the author creates a complex web of relations and associations. Pohl draws attention to the distortions that take place when jazz is transferred from its original environment into other cultural and linguistic contexts. Names, song titles, and all sorts of props translated into German sound exotic, satirical, or simply trivial. Thus, imitating Miles Davis’s way of making music, Kind aus Blau provides an extravagant concept of melophrasis that integrates the jazz star into the tradition of European avant-garde art.

In: Popular Music and the Poetics of Self in Fiction

Abstract

Emile Verhaeren, considered by many contemporary critics as the most German among French-language poets, became one of Stefan Zweig’s favourite writers soon after the turn of the century. His vitalist interpretation of Verhaeren’s poems, highlighting life, action, and a pseudo-religious belief in modernity, was directed against the aestheticism and scepticism reigning, for instance, among the circle of Young Vienna writers. Zweig’s enthusiasm for Verhaeren made him write a biography of the Belgian poet and translate, among other works, two comprehensive collections of his poetry. This chapter compares Zweig’s versions of Verhaeren’s poetry with translations made by ten other translators (Ludwig Scharf, Rudolf Komadina, Stefan George, Erna Rehwoldt, Richard Schaukal, Joseph Jaffé, Friedrich von Oppeln-Bronikowski, Ernst Ludwig Schellenberg, Otto Hauser, and an anonymous translator). The comparison demonstrates Zweig’s creative-adaptive approach to translation, whereas other translators preferred using word-for-word translation or rather conventional ‘poetic’ language in Verhaeren’s poems.

In: Brussels 1900 Vienna