Editor: Nycole Prowse
Intervening Spaces examines the interconnectedness between bodies, time and space - the oscillating and at times political impact that occurs when bodies and space engage in non-conventional ways. Bodies intervene with space, creating place. Likewise, space can reconceptualise notions of the subject-body. Such respatialisation does not occur in a temporal vacuum. The moment can be more significant than a millennia in producing new ways to see corporeal connections with space. Drawing on theorists as diverse as Foucault, Deleuze, Guattari, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, Lefebvre and Grosz, temporal and spatial dichotomies are dissolved, disrupted and interrupted via interventions—revealing new ways of inhabiting space. The volume crosses disciplines contributing to the fields of Sociology, Literature, Performance Arts, Visual Arts, Architecture and Urban Design.

Contributors are Burcu Baykan, Pelin Dursun Çebi, Michelle Collins, Christobel Kelly, Anthi Kosma, Ana Carolina Lima e Ferreira, Katerina Mojanchevska, Clementine Monro, Katsuhiko Muramoto, Nycole Prowse, Shelley Smith, Nicolai Steinø and İklim Topaloğlu.
In: Intervening Spaces
In: Intervening Spaces
Author: Nycole Prowse

Abstract

This section begins with an analysis of the leaky representations of time, space and the body in drug literature. It is selected as the opening chapter of this section because of its theoretical approach, as well as the thematic focus of the way in which interventions upon the body (via the drug trope) are reflective of the way the body is inhabited by and inhabits space. For this examination, this chapter utilises Elizabeth Grosz’s understanding of how bodies live and are positioned as spatio-temporal beings. Grosz suggests that ‘…in order to reconceive bodies, and to understand the kinds of active interrelations possible between (lived) representations of the body and (theoretical) representations of space and time, the bodies of each sex need to be accorded the possibility of a different space-time framework’. This chapter proposes that drug literature provides a platform where alternative corporeal possibilities can be played out. In the literary sphere the drug trope reframes spatial and temporal regulatory notions of the body. The drug metaphor disrupts temporal linearity through the reconfiguration of junk time. Likewise, landscapes, cityscapes and a sense of place are re-imagined in fluid, drugged dreamscapes.

In: Intervening Spaces
In: Intervening Spaces
In: Intervening Spaces
Author: Nycole Prowse

Elizabeth Grosz’s seminal text, Space, Time and Perversion, initiated a postmodern feminist understanding of how bodies live and are positioned as spatio-temporal beings. Grosz suggests that ‘in order to reconceive bodies, and to understand the kinds of active interrelations possible between (lived) representations of the body and (theoretical) representations of space and time, the bodies of each sex need to be accorded the possibility of a different space-time framework.’ This chapter proposes that drug literature provides a platform where such alternative corporeal possibilities can be played out. In the literary sphere the drug trope reframes spatial and temporal regulatory notions of the body. The drug metaphor disrupts temporal linearity through the reconfiguration of ‘junk time’. Likewise, landscapes, cityscapes and a sense of place are re-imagined in fluid, drugged dreamscapes. In this way, drug imagery evokes leakages and slippages across time, space and the body enabling a re-evaluation of corporeal possibilities and potential. The extremities of drug use create a hyperbolic subject-body in drug literature and also magnify the examination of difference between bodies based on gender and corresponding (dis)connections with space and time. A textual analysis of two Australian novels, Helen Garner’s Monkey Grip and Luke Davies Candy, provides a literary comparison to canvas Grosz’s assertions on the implication of gender when reframing the spatio-temporal positionality of bodies. Both novels portray junk bodies inhabiting and (in)habited by the inner-city urban space radicalising traditional notions of subjectivity and a sense of place in Australian fiction. Both novels utilise the drug trope to intensify and collapse spatial-temporal-corporeal divisions, however, they do so differently and with contrasting outcomes. In particular, the impact of gender on the opiated reconfiguration of time and space in Garner’s and Davies’ novels will be examined for its repercussions on agency for the female subject.

In: Time, Space and the Human Body: An Interdisciplinary Look
Author: Nycole Prowse

This chapter discusses the socially propagated ‘dilemma’ of the addicted mother – its depiction in literature and the political assumptions, structures and policies such literature reflects. Literary representations of female addiction, in particular representations of the addicted mother, are embedded in cultural traditions which view the female addict, like the drugs she uses, as a menace – destabilising the foundations of civilisation. Women are traditionally viewed as gatekeepers between good and evil, chaos and constraint; the guardians and perpetuators of civilisation. Addicted mothers, therefore, are seen to betray society and are represented in literature and policy, as monstrous figures. The marginalisation of the ‘drugged’ feminine, necessitates and upholds the patriarchal symbolic order. This chapter explores this feminine positionality in the novel The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things by Laura Albert, who uses the pseudonym and fictional persona of JT LeRoy. Albert/LeRoy’s portrayal of Sarah, a drug addicted mother, exposes the positionality of the ‘drugged’ feminine as both inside and outside the symbolic order. Sarah is both innocent, (her addiction is blamed on an abusive father) and demonised for her betrayal of the socially ensconced expectations of the mother (her son lives a transient life and he is physically and sexually abused and abandoned). This chapter’s analysis of Albert/LeRoy’s novel exposes and critiques the existence of stabilizing and regulating cultural and political forces represented in a supposedly non-mainstream, contemporary cultural product, and one by a female author posing as a male author. As such, this chapter attempts to challenge the universalising notions/representations of the addicted mother as monstrous.

In: The Evil Body
Author: Nycole Prowse

Michel Foucault’s analysis of the evolution of punishment over the past 200 years in his polemic Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison (1975) parallels the history of addiction and its eventual move into the realm of jurisprudence. That is, the evolution of punishment and regulation of the subject aligns with the construct of addiction from moral and medical models of concern to one of vice. Addiction as vice is justified in a penal/judicial paradigm that progressively became less concerned with the offence, the crime, the act and more concerned with the individual: ‘what they are, will be, may be.’ These shadows embody the drug user making him/her criminal. The crime of addiction, however, is ameliorated within drug literature. It is through literature, with its ability to provide a different repertoire of experience from medical, scientific or juridical discourses, that the concepts of punishment and addiction can be reframed. The confessional nature of drug literature both mimics and mocks the juridical forms of punishment, power and control over the non-conforming subject. The confessor/addict is brought in from the shadows and is made honourable, valuable and authentic within drug literature. The carnivalesque nature of the criminal’s confession on the scaffold is analogous to drug literature where ‘rules [are] inverted; authority mocked and criminals transformed into heroes.’ Female drug literature disrupts the more marginalised positionality of the female subject/addict within juridical paradigms. In Anna Kavan’s story Julia and the Bazooka (1975), the trope of addiction is used to highlight the subjugation of the female subject/addict but is also represented as defence against oppressive societal constraints, asserting female drug writing as a form of agency.

In: Reframing Punishment: Reflections of Culture, Literature and Morals