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In: Ritual Dynamics and Religious Change in the Roman Empire
In: Ritual Dynamics and Religious Change in the Roman Empire
Open Access
In: Ritual Dynamics and Religious Change in the Roman Empire
Author: O. Hekster
The emperor Commodus (AD 180-192) has commonly been portrayed as an insane madman, whose reign marked the beginning of the end of the Roman Empire. Indeed, the main point of criticism on his father, Marcus Aurelius, is that he appointed his son as his successor. Especially Commodus’ behaviour as a gladiator, and the way he represented himself with divine attributes (especially those of Hercules), are often used as evidence for the emperor’s presumed madness. However, this ‘political biography’ will apply modern interpretations of the spectacles in the arena, and of the imperial cult, to Commodus' reign. It will focus on the dissemination and reception of imperial images, and suggest that there was a method in Commodus’ madness.
Roman Empire, c. 200 B.C. – A.D. 476
The publications in the series reflect the aims and scope of the International Network “Impact of Empire (Roman Empire, 2000 BC – AD 476)” which focuses on the consequences of the actions and sheer existence of the Roman Empire in the wide, culturally heterogeneous region it dominated, i.e. a large part of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The series publishes the proceedings of the (annual) workshops as well as monographs and collections of essays on this subject.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
In: Frontiers in the Roman World
Open Access
In: Frontiers in the Roman World
In: Crises and the Roman Empire
Open Access
In: Crises and the Roman Empire
Proceedings of the Seventh Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Nijmegen, June 20-24, 2006)
This volume presents the proceedings of the seventh workshop of the international thematic network 'Impact of Empire', which concentrates on the history of the Roman Empire and brings together ancient historians, archaeologists, classicists and specialists on Roman law from some 30 European and North American universities. The seventh volume focuses on the impact that crises had on the development and functioning of the Roman Empire from the Republic to Late Imperial times. The following themes are treated: the role of crises in the empire as a whole; the relationship between crises and the Roman economy; modes in which crises influenced the presentation of emperors, and the impact of crises on and reception in (legal) writings.