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Oliver Davies

In this paper I set out a phenomenology of social transformation, based on an analysis of the distinctively religious form of communication which underlies the trans-generational and trans-cultural transmission of world traditions, taking Confucianism and Christianity as their representatives. A phenomenological analysis of their communicative structure allows the possibility of a better understanding of what can be learnt from them in the context of contemporary debates in both China and the West on the relations between religion, ethics and politics. This analysis suggests that the ethical consistency of belief and act, which is the necessary condition for the engendering of long-term solidarity in religious community, has significant implications for ethics in politics, and especially for the legitimacy of representational leadership as a focal point for change in society. The paper concludes that the historical experience of world religions can offer new insights into the nature of political leadership and representation in today’s globalised world and that the appropriate locus for this inquiry is the present negotiation and re-negotiation of relations between China and the West.

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Oliver Davies

In this article, in dialogue with Pentecostal theologians, I argue that our contemporary science allows us to return to a transformational account of the embodied self and the material world, with implications in particular for both Christology and pneumatology and their relation. On the basis of a reading of Acts 2.32–36, in which Christ in heaven ‘pours forth’ the Holy Spirit upon the first Church, I argue that the reality of the living Christ for us is itself the work of the Holy Spirit and itself communicates the work of the Spirit. This suggests the possibility of a Trinitarian koinonia which points to the unity of the Spirit-filled doxology and devotion of the worshipping Church on the one hand, and to the active life of discipleship through our acts of following Christ on the other.

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Echoes

Ethics and Issues of Voice in Education Research

Edited by Warren Midgley, Andy Davies, Mark E. Oliver and Patrick Alan Danaher

Echoes: Ethics and Issues of Voice in Education breaks new ground in the field of education research ethics, by examining different perspectives on the role, influence and importance of voice.
Drawing on a variety of philosophical and paradigmatic approaches, Echoes: Ethics and Issues of Voice in Education examines how and the different ways in which researchers conceptualise voice in the context of broader theoretical and methodological issues relating to research ethics.
Written by authors working across the globe in a variety of academic contexts, it asks:

How might voice in education be reconceptualised?
What factors influence whether or not, and in what ways, voices are heard and/or (re)presented in education research?
What implications do (re)conceptualisations of voice have with respect to the ethics of education research?
What methods can be used to explore the role, importance and influence of voice in education research from an ethics perspective?
How might voices be appropriately acknowledged and represented in education research?

Echoes: Ethics and Issues of Voice in Education invites the reader to join the conversation, as it prompts reflection and discussion about the challenges and concerns inherent in the representation of voice in education research.