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  • Author or Editor: Otavio Augusto Vuolo Marques x
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Roberta Richard Pinto, Otavio Augusto Vuolo Marques and Ronaldo Fernandes

Abstract

The reproductive biology of Chironius flavolineatus and C. quadricarinatus from the Brazilian Cerrado domain is described, including sexual maturity, female fecundity, and reproductive cycles of males and females. Egg-laying is recorded here for the first time for C. quadricarinatus. Males of both species attain sexual maturity with a smaller snout-vent length than females. Females of C. flavolineatus have an extended reproductive cycle with egg production during the wet season, whereas males exhibit year-round sperm production. Chironius quadricarinatus has continuous reproductive cycles in both sexes. Differences in reproductive pattern between these two sympatric species are probably related to phylogenetic constraints on intrageneric lineages of Chironius.

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Otavio Augusto Vuolo Marques, Ronaldo Fernandes and Roberta Richard Pinto

Abstract

The morphometry and diet of two sympatric species of Chironius (C. flavolineatus and C. quadricarinatus) from Brazilian Cerrado are described. The two snake species differ in external morphology, as Chironius flavolineatus was the largest species (body, tail and eyes) whereas C. quadricarinatus the heaviest. Each species also showed marked sexual size dimorphism. In terms of dietary ecology, both species feed exclusively on frogs with a heavy preference for hylids and may have tendency to eat small items, as noticed in other colubrine species. These two snake species showed a brownish colour pattern and exhibited no ontogenetic variation, suggesting that juveniles and adults use similar substrates. Chironius flavolineatus and C. quadricarinatus present a semi-arboreal habit, with active foraging behaviour, feeding in the ground most of time. Chironius flavolineatus uses higher vegetation for resting and, based on morphological results, seems to be more arboreal than C. quadricarinatus.