Cross-field pitting is one of the most reliable characters for softwood identification. During charcoalification, a range of severe qualitative and quantitative modifications may occur in cross-field pitting. As most fossil or archaeological wood remains are preserved as charcoal (fusain), the question arises whether these modifications hamper the accurate identification of some taxa. This work is a systematic biometric study of a wide range of gymnosperm cross-field pitting after experimental charcoalification. We focused on the window-like, piceoid, taxodioid, cupressoid, araucarioid and podocarpoid cross-field pitting types. Our main results are the following: 1) Cross-field pits of wood specimens dried out before charcoalification are hidden by a thin closing wall; in this case, it is often impossible to discriminate between the various types of cross-field pitting. 2) Piceoid cross-field pitting becomes taxodioid-like after charcoalification. 3) Biometric study of charred softwood cross-field pitting dimensions shows that the ratios between height and width of pit aperture and border allow us to distinguish and characterise four types of pitting (window-like, piceoid, taxodioid, cupressoid +araucarioid +podocarpoid [= CAP]). The discrimination within the CAP type requires further investigation.

In: IAWA Journal

ABSTRACT

Most evolutionary innovations in plant vascular tissues, including secondary growth, occurred during the Devonian period (~420 to 360 million years ago). Such innovations had a major impact on land colonisation by plants and on their biodiversity. Here, we show the hydraulic conductance of the secondary xylem of three shrubby or arborescent plant fossils (a probably new genus of Cladoxylopsida, the archaeopteridalean genus Callixylon and the stenokolean genus Brabantophyton). Evidences come from the Ronquières fossil site (Belgium). This site is considered mid-late Givetian/earliest Frasnian in age. Results reveal that hydraulic conductivity of these early woody plants is more or less similar to that of modern gymnosperms, meaning that water transport was already as efficient in Devonian plants as it is in living plants. Our results further suggest that tracheids with features helping for optimised water transport were quickly selected in the evolutionary history of vascular plants.

In: IAWA Journal