John XXII and the Power to Dissolve
The Medieval Church taught that marriage was indissoluble and that consent was the key. Why then could a marriage be dissolved by one spouse joining a religious order after an exchange of consent but before consummation? This question vexed Thirteenth-century academics and, in the fourteenth century, Pope John XXII asked a group of leading theologians and lawyers to study the issue. Position-papers were produced to explain the exception to the rule of indissolubility for chaste monks and nuns, and to explore whether the pope had the power to extend it to celibate priests and deacons. These texts, edited here, were used by John XXII to draft his bull Antique Concertationi (1322). This study reconstructs the story behind the constitution, providing a unique insight into the decision-making process at the Roman curia in Avignon under a controversial pope.
In: Defenders and Critics of Franciscan Life
In: Franciscans and Preaching
In Honor of John Monfasani
Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters is a volume dedicated to John Monfasani, renowned scholar of Latin and Greek rhetoric and philosophy. These essays range from Antiquity to the Enlightenment, in genre from learned notes to editiones principes, and in discipline from intellectual to socio-economic history. An introduction to Monfasani’s life and works, and a list of his opera open the volume.

Contributors include Michael J.B. Allen, Sándor Bene, Concetta Bianca, Robert Black, Christopher Celenza, Brian Copenhaver, John Demetracopoulos, James Hankins, Martin Hinterberger, Thomas Izbicki, David Jacoby, Peter Mack, Lodi Nauta, David Rundle, David Rutherford, Chris Schabel, April Shelford, and Thomas M. Ward.
In: Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters
In: Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters
In: Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters
In: Essays in Renaissance Thought and Letters