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In: Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected
Author: Paul A. Harris

Abstract

This paper provides a general overview of emergence, and then examines the role emergence plays in different areas of science and theology, including big history or the evolutionary epic, religious and theistic naturalism. Critical remarks on the notions of time expressed in these discourses are also provided. The paper then assesses J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time in relation to emergence, and adduces the position Fraser would take with respect to emergence. Finally, the paper concludes with a playful coda from the standpoint of a man of letters, for whom letters have an elemental importance.

In: KronoScope
Author: Paul A. Harris

Abstract

This essay examines different modes of organizing narrative time and the thinking about time that narrative temporalities make possible. J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time is framed as a narrative which displays a conflict between subsuming time into form and depicting a natural history of time. Fraser’s work is characterized by an eotemporal narrative time that is able to range freely across a continuous, reversible temporal world. Fraser’s assessment of Samuel Beckett’s plays as depicting a prototemporal cosmos is summarized and then supplemented with reflections on how the prototemporal narrative time of Waiting for Godot enables thought to confront time, death and life in stark clarity.

In: KronoScope
In: Time: Limits and Constraints
Author: Paul A. Harris

This essay discusses the Cretan labyrinth in relation to J.T. Fraser’s concept of eotemporality. The Cretan labyrinth is treated in diverse contexts, including its depiction in mythology and the archaeological attempts to locate it. The topology of the ‘Cretan’ or ‘classical’ labyrinth is analyzed, and a phenomenological account of the temporal experience facilitated by walking the labyrinth is provided.

In: KronoScope
Author: Paul A. Harris

Abstract

This essay reflects on “Time and Variance” through the lens of slow time. Slow time is defined in both psychological and physical terms, as a contemplative mode of thought and geologic and cosmic timescales, respectively. It argues that slow thought facilitates “temporal phronesis,” an ability to conceptualize and accommodate disparate timescales, and analyzes gardens and art installations that explore time in variance in different ways and facilitate temporal phronesis. The essay also argues that J. T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time is complicated by considering “Gaiatemporality,” constituted by the conflicts created by the intrusion of humanity into earth processes.

In: Time in Variance
In: Time and Uncertainty
This interdisciplinary volume of essays explores how the notion of time varies across disciplines by examining variance as a defining feature of temporalities in cultural, creative, and scholarly contexts. Featuring a President’s Address by philosopher David Wood, it begins with critical reassessments of J.T. Fraser’s hierarchical theory of time through the lens of Anthropocene studies, philosophy, ecological theory, and ecological literature; proceeds to variant narratives in fiction, video games, film, and graphic novels; and concludes by measuring time’s variance with tools as different as incense clocks and computers, and by marking variance in music, film, and performance art.
In: Time in Variance