Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for

  • Author or Editor: Paul Bushkovitch x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
in Christian Muslim Relations Online II

Abstract

The Romanian writer Nikolae Milescu (Nikolai Gavrilovich Spafarii) was the author of several books designed for the tsar and the Russian court in the 1670's. Working under the patronage of Tsar Aleksei's favorite, Artamon Matveev, Spafarii composed an account of exemplary monarchs from the past called Vasiliologion. He presented ancient and Biblical monarchs as just and wise but also as great conquerors and builders of cities, even when they were pagans. His portrait of Russian monarchs was closer to traditional Orthodox conceptions, but still stressed military victory and building. Spafarii was one of the first writers in Russia to introduce the Aristotelian political terms, monarchy and aristocracy.

In: Russian History

The Illustrated Chronicle Compilation, one of the great projects of Ivan the Terrible’s reign, included a full Russian translation of the History of the Destruction of Troy by the thirteenth century Sicilian judge, Guido delle Colonne. A prose version of a French romance of chivalry, the text fits poorly with our conceptions of sixteenth century Russian culture. Was it history or fiction? Was it secular, or is that term not useful? Partial answers come from references to the text by the boyar V. M. Tuchkov, Ivan himself, and the use of the text by later authors after the Time of Troubles.

In: Russian History
In: The Russo-Japanese War in Global Perspective

Abstract

Studies in both Russia and Italy over the past sixty-odd years on Maksim Grek (né Michael Trivolis) on his Greek origins and formation, his time spent in Florence, Venice, and Mirandola, his education, personal ties, and work there, and on his original writings and translations while in Muscovy have greatly enriched our knowledge of this central figure in 16th-century Russian religion and culture. Of special note here are evidence of manuscripts he copied while in Italy, precise borrowings from Savonarola’s and other Roman Catholic writings, and a polemic Maksim composed in Russia against a Spanish-Flemish treatise on Augustine’s City of God. Much work also still remains to be done on Maksim’s original compositions, on the impact of his translations, and his international connections during his time in Muscovy.

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies

Abstract

The marriage of Sofiia Palaiologina and Ivan III of Moscow has been the subject of much speculation about Russia and Byzantium but little analysis of the reality of her role in Russian history. We know very little about her activity as the wife of the grand prince, though that may be because of the character of the chronicle sources. In the relations of Moscow and Lithuania concerning the marriage of her daughter Elena to Grand Prince Alexander her role can be glimpsed behind the protocol, perhaps because the sources are diplomatic records. After her death Sofiia acquired another role: the legend of the miraculous birth of Vasilii III was one of the foundational stories behind the annual pilgrimage of the Russian court to the Holy Trinity-St. Sergii Monastery.

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies