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In: Gesnerus

In 2010 Germany celebrated the 20th anniversary of reunification. This event is selected and contextualised by cultural narratives in order to create a coherent common cultural memory. In contrast with the 70s and 80s when Berlin and the Wall served as a setting for tragic love-stories and art house-films, the more recent films can now treat this era of German history as concluded. But the ‘Eastern Germany’ appearing in the movies remains highly ambiguous and inconsistent. Ambiguities and fragmentary constituted forms of narration can be seen as signs of what Lyotard called ‘the end of great narratives’ (one of them being GDRsocialism). With the end of these narratives, totality is seen as dissolving with its fragments being assembled into something new. This hybridisation (pastiche, parody) extends the representation of the former GDR. The copy becomes as valid as the original, as continuity and discontinuity get mixed up. The historic past of the other is not imitated but simulated in the present, yet still subject to fights for interpretive primacy. The chapter shall analyse the different shapes of the ‘filmic GDR’—as a humourist petit-bourgeois-socialist setting or a so-called ‘nostalgic’ long gone republic. Special attention shall be paid to the reception within reunited German society (press, critics, politics). This is especially interesting as reunited Germany writes the filmic history in accordance with Western common sense.

In: Landscapes of (Un)Belonging: Reflections of Strangeness and Self

In 2010 Germany celebrated the 20th anniversary of reunification. This event is selected and contextualised by cultural narratives in order to create a coherent common cultural memory. In contrast with the 70s and 80s when Berlin and the Wall served as a setting for tragic love-stories and art house-films, the more recent films can now treat this era of German history as concluded. But the ‘Eastern Germany’ appearing in the movies remains highly ambiguous and inconsistent. Ambiguities and fragmentary constituted forms of narration can be seen as signs of what Lyotard called ‘the end of great narratives’ (one of them being GDRsocialism). With the end of these narratives, totality is seen as dissolving with its fragments being assembled into something new. This hybridisation (pastiche, parody) extends the representation of the former GDR. The copy becomes as valid as the original, as continuity and discontinuity get mixed up. The historic past of the other is not imitated but simulated in the present, yet still subject to fights for interpretive primacy. The chapter shall analyse the different shapes of the ‘filmic GDR’—as a humourist petit-bourgeois-socialist setting or a so-called ‘nostalgic’ long gone republic. Special attention shall be paid to the reception within reunited German society (press, critics, politics). This is especially interesting as reunited Germany writes the filmic history in accordance with Western common sense.

In: Landscapes of (Un)Belonging: Reflections of Strangeness and Self

This essay focuses on passages drawn from two important texts of the medieval Śaiva Tantra, the Tantrāloka and Tantrasāra of Abhinavagupta. In particular, it examines the ways in which the tenth century Kashmiri theologian of Śaivism articulates views on the Yoga of Tantrism. The approach Abhinavagupta takes directly criticizes the classical Yoga of Patañjali. This he categorizes as artificial, and contrasts it with the ‘natural’ and spontaneous Yoga of Śaivism he here propounds. A particular focus of the essay centers on the role of the mind, intellectual knowledge, and perfected reason, ‘tarka’ in the liberative methods here prescribed by Abhinavagupta. The essay touches on the four-fold categorization of upāya or liberative methods that is central to this form of Tantric Yoga. As well, it examines the notion of vikalpa-saṃskāra, the refinement and purification of mental states intrinsic to several of these upāya-s. The essay intends to contribute to an understanding of the ways in which the meaning of yoga changed in the early medieval period as a result of the theological innovations of the Śaivas.

In: Theory and Practice of Yoga
Essays über den Zwischenraum von Denken und Dichten
Dort, wo Philosophie an ihre Grenze stößt, wird die Begegnung mit ihrem Anderen, der Sprache von Dichtung und Literatur, attraktiv. In zwölf Essays untersucht Wolfgang Müller-Funk exemplarische Konstellationen von dichterischen Denkern und denkerischen Dichtern. Entgegen dem traditionsreichen Misstrauen, das die Philosophie gegenüber der Dichtung hegt, besteht zwischen beiden Disziplinen ein oftmals verschwiegener, doch tiefgreifender Austausch. Diesem komplexen Verhältnis wechselseitiger Einflussnahme sind die Essays dieser Studie gewidmet, die von Schellings Zwiesprache mit Cervantes bis hin zu Hannah Arendt und Hermann Broch oder Paul Celan und Emmanuel Lévinas reichen. Im essayistischen Zwischenbereich von Philosophie und Literatur lassen sich so Verständigungen nachzeichnen, die alternative Freiräume der Sagbarkeit sondieren.
In: Machtphantasien in englischsprachigen Faust-Dichtungen: Funktionsgeschichtliche Studien
Von der Kolonial- zur Entwicklungspolitik
In: Iconoclasm and Iconoclash
In: Iconoclasm and Iconoclash
In: Iconoclasm and Iconoclash