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Typographia Batava, 1541-1600 (2 Vols.)

Repertorium van boeken gedrukt in Nederland tussen 1541 en 1600 / A Repertorium of Books Printed in the Northern Netherlands between 1541 and 1600

Paul Valkema Blouw

Describes 7,438 editions. A major landmark in Dutch Bibliography, one of the most important features of which is the attribution to a given printer of the thousands of anonymously published editions which appeared during this period. The work is concluded by six indices. One of the most important features of the Typographica Batava is the attribution to a given printer of thousands of anonymously published editions which appeared during this period as a consequence of the region's current political- and religious situation.
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Paul Valkema Blouw

Abstract

In 1561, after a deadlock of many years, a new printing-office was set up in Holland by Jan van Zuren and three others, including the author Dirck Coornhert. After one year of publishing the press concluded most of its activities, and-according to documentary information recently found- the company was dissolved. Jan van Zuren became the sole owner of the firm, which over the next three years only issued a few books on commission. The production then ended completely. What became of the typographical material of the printing-shop has always been a mystery. As a result of bibliographical analysis it has now become clear that all the typefaces, initials and ornaments (including the devices)-in fact the whole inventory-were removed to the French town of Sedan. With the permission of the Duke of Bouillon a press was founded, which issued a number of exclusively Protestant works, most of them in Dutch, together with a few political publications in French emanating from the Calvinist leaders of the Resistance to Spanish rule. In 1565 the first factor to run the printing-shop, Goossen Goebens, made his name known in the imprint of a panegyric on the foundation of the press. The following year his place was taken by Lenaert der Kinderen, who broke his contract with Plantin for this new post. In 1567 the press appears to have been active in another town, again in another country. At some time during this year the printing-shop was moved to Emden in East Frisia, where, in 1569, the typographical material is to be found in a book published by the emigrant Jean Malet. Meanwhile six publications, including five Protestant books, were issued without any imprint. Circumstantial evidence justifies the conclusion that one or both of Dirck Coornhert's brothers then were running the printing-office, which they probably already owned in the Sedan period.

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Paul Valkema Blouw

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Paul Valkema Blouw

Abstract

Despite the increased interest in all aspects of the Radical Reformation we are still in need of a bibliography of David Joris which might satisfy reasonable requirements. A. van der Linde's book, which presented itself as such over a century ago, is imprecise and not unnaturally entirely out of date. A new version would thus fulfil an obvious need. The reasons for which it has not yet been undertaken must be sought in the complication created by the fact that the hundreds of writings all appeared without an imprint. The dates, if indeed any are given, generally apply to the composition of the text and only coincide exceptionally with the often considerably later year of publication. All we can conclude from historical sources is that a number of his tracts were published in Deventer in about 1540 by Albert Pafraet and Dirk (II) van den Borne. In order to determine who dared to work for the arch-heretic (or, after his death, for later followers of his teaching) it is impossible to avoid a bibliographical analysis. In this manner we find the names of various of his printers and, from the years of their activity, we can deduce sufficient indications to date the publication of the writings within certain limits. This investigation shows that the first were indeed printed in Deventer, the very earliest being a treatise which has so far been ascribed to the Anabaptist Bernhard Rothmann. Thereafter David Joris gave orders for his works to be printed alternately in Antwerp, to Adriaen van Berghen, and in Deventer. After he had left for Basel he briefly applied to the services of two printers in the German-speaking area until he discovered a permanent supplier in the future university printer Ludwig Dietz in Rostock. The sectarian's death and his posthumous execution in 1559 were succeeded by a few decades of silence in the camp of his followers. In 1584, however, an edition of the Wonderboeck, entirely revised by the author, appeared and was soon followed by a series of other publications. Much previously unpublished work proved to have remained in the possession of David Joris's family. The printer, as he himself was later to admit, was Dirk Mullem in Rotterdam. When his activities came to an end in the last years of the century, other publishers took over the task.

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Paul Valkema Blouw

Abstract

The names Niclaes van Oldenborch and Magnus vanden Merberghe van O(e)sterhout have long presented historians of the Dutch book with a problem. They appear as imprints in two series of, mostly theological, publications in the vernacular, published respectively in the third and fourth decade of the sixteenth century and in the 1550s. Owing to the attributions of Dr Kronenberg, the distinguished expert in the field, the Van Oldenborch production swelled into a list of almost forty publications, a substantial part of the Protestant works to have been issued in the period. She was convinced of the man's historicity and continued to insist on it even after serious doubts had arisen about the accuracy of the principal piece of information on which she based her views. Further research now proves that, as had already been suggested earlier, Van Oldenborch was indeed a pseudonym, used by more than one printer in Antwerp and presumably also in Kampen. A total of seven, if not of eight, publishers adopted it at various times. Vanden Merberghe, too, was a fake imprint, but only one printer seems to have concealed his identity with it: Frans Fraet in Antwerp. Hitherto he was known exclusively for his literary work, even if he was reputed to have been executed for the publication of prohibited books in 1558. The production that actually led to so severe a sentence remained a riddle, however. The results of this research also show that nearly all the 'Van Oldenborch' publications which Dr Kronenberg regarded as post-incunabula appeared after 1540 and that a number of them can even be dated later than 1550. She placed the entire group notably too early. We can assume that this revision will be of consequence for the chronology of the Reformation in the Low Countries in so far as it depended on the diffusion of the new religious ideas in printed form.

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Paul Valkema Blouw

Abstract

Partly intended as a summary of recent research on Plantin's activities, this article provides a new interpretation of certain aspects of his career: the circumstances in which the Officina came into existence; the collaboration between Plantin and Hendrik Niclaes as partners in a printing shop in Kampen which besides various publications by the prophet, produced two editions of the Bible; and the course of events in the transfer of Plantin's