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In: Refugee Archives
In: Refugee Archives
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Abstract

Although often portrayed as a health paradise, there were many deficiencies in New Zealand medical services in the 1930s. Despite this situation, the New Zealand medical profession resisted the well-qualified refugee doctors, who wished to settle in what in the later 1930s looked to be a remote but safe corner of the world. With the outbreak of war, New Zealand’s government imposed a policy of isolation, so that arrival permits ceased to be issued. The New Zealand government, medical association and Otago University agreed to extend the time needed for “requalifying” from one to three years. Designated ‘enemy aliens’, the refugees were subject to selective internment and general restrictions. Many hospitals decided against employing ‘enemy aliens’ despite shortages of qualified doctors. This paper presents an analysis of the biographies of the select group of doctors who settled in New Zealand, which emerges as one of the most restrictive destinations in the world for refugee doctors from Nazi persecution.

In: Refugees from Nazi-occupied Europe in British Overseas Territories
In: Doctors, Politics and Society: Historical Essays
In: Doctors, Politics and Society: Historical Essays